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Latest updates from the campaign:

Tuesday, October 16, 2018 7:58 PM

October 16 Newsletter

Yesterday, the General Assembly met for a Second Special Session in order to address more immediate concerns in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence. In total, $850 million will be used for relief efforts. Most of the money appropriated by SB 3 (2018 Hurricane Florence Disaster Recovery Act) came from the Rainy Day Fund, which was established by the General Assembly under Republican leadership in recent years. The bill received unanimous votes for approval in both chambers of the General Assembly and was signed today by Governor Cooper. The provisions of the bill included:

· Using $2 million for the establishment of a 45-person Office of Recovery and Resiliency to coordinate disaster recovery efforts, provide public outreach, hire vendors for project management, and audit and report results.

· $65 million for the Department of Public Safety, matching the federal government’s commitment.

· $65 million for the Department of Transportation, also matching the federal government’s commitment.

· $70 million for agriculture assistance including a federal match and other farm recovery activities and repairs.

· $60 million to repair and renovate damaged public schools.

· $30 million to repair the campuses of UNC-W, UNC-P, and Fayetteville State University.

· $5 million for repairs at community colleges, and $8.5 million to make up for reduced tuition revenues.

· $8 million to help college students who had losses from the storm remain enrolled in community colleges and universities throughout the state.

· $33 million for several housing assistance and repair programs.

· $28 million to assist local governments with recovery.

· Tens of millions more dollars will meet needs in behavioral health, community hospitals, small businesses, community colleges, and mosquito abatement efforts in areas of North Carolina affected by Hurricane Florence.

· Funding for coastal beach renourishment, dredging needs, marine debris cleanup, and commercial fishermen were also included in the recovery package.

· The measure includes a fix for members of the National Guard who participated in the response to Hurricane Matthew. The bill waives outstanding debt service members owed due to accidental overpayments by the Department of Public Safety (DPS). It also requires DPS to reimburse service members who already repaid the department.

On November 27th, the General Assembly will return to Raleigh to enact further legislation aimed at mitigating the effects of Hurricane Florence.


Friday, October 5, 2018 10:42 AM

Hurricane Florence Bi-Partisan Relief

Today, the General Assembly took its first steps in delivering relief to those affected by Hurricane Florence. This included addressing teacher pay, school calendars, election issues, mosquitoes and more. We will be reconvening to consider a larger funding package to help storm victims. This is only the start - we're going to make sure folks get the assistance they need each step of the way.


Friday, October 5, 2018 10:36 AM

Rep. Davis at the Red Cross

The Salvation Army is such a wonderful Christian organization. I helped them to distribute supplies, which included clean-up kits, brooms, mops, tarps, food boxes, water, hygiene items, and infant items. All of the volunteers were so friendly and respectful of the individuals that came for help, and those who received the supplies were thankful to get them.


When I was giving out hygiene supplies, I took the opportunity to speak to as many of the recipients as possible, thanked them for coming, and wished them the best. Once again, so many different people coming together to help those victims of the Hurricane in need. Yet another example of why I am so proud that I am from and live in New Hanover County.


Wednesday, October 3, 2018 3:00 PM

October 2 Newsletter

Today, I was joined by my fellow members of the General Assembly to consider two Bills in order to begin the process of addressing issues that stem from Hurricane Florence in counties that have been designated under a major disaster declaration by the President of the United States.

The first Bill, SB 2 (School Calendar & Pay/Hurricane Florence) addressed immediate concerns by providing flexibility in the school calendar and facilitating compensation for school employees.

· Public school units in FEMA designated counties may, in their discretion, make up days missed, deem completed up to 20 days missed, or any combination of those two options. This allows each particular school district to do what is best under their particular circumstances.

· Public school units in non-FEMA designated counties, for days in excess of the first two days missed, may, in their discretion, make up days missed, deem days completed, or any combination of those two options. If a public school unit’s scheduled calendar will already meet the 185 day or 1025 hour requirement, the public school unit does not have to make up the first two days missed.

· Public school employees, other than charter school employees, would be deemed employed and would be provided compensation on days deemed complete that are not required to be made up. This will make sure that all school employees receive a pay check. As to charter schools, the General Assembly does not have the authority to direct how charter schools pay their employees.

· Due to schools being closed, $6.5 million was appropriated to provide compensation for school lunch employees whose compensation is normally provided by school lunch receipts and federal funds on instructional days.

· Allow certain college students who are enrolled in an educator preparation program and who are affected by Hurricane Florence to have the clinical internship requirement of the program deemed completed.

The second Bill, HB 4 (the Hurricane Florence Emergency Response Act), of which I was a Primary Sponsor, addressed other immediate concerns by establishing the Hurricane Florence Disaster Recovery Fund, facilitating extended voter registration days, assisting in mosquito population control, and waiving DMV and homeowner recovery fees. $56.5 million was appropriated to the fund from the Saving Reserve.

· $50 million was appropriated to provide the State match and also for costs and programs authorized under G.S. 166A-19.42(b) (State Emergency Response and Disaster Relief Fund). Currently, this applies to 28 counties that were designated under the major disaster declarations, but that number could grow.

· The deadline for voter registration applications in counties designated as major disaster zones has been extended to 5 PM on October 15, 2018.

· County boards of elections can unanimously vote to provide for a substitution if a one-stop voting site was damaged by Hurricane Florence.

· Allows a county board of election to alter voting places for Election Day if the change is to substitute a voting place that was damaged by Hurricane Florence.

· $400,000 was appropriated to the Bipartisan State Board of Elections and Ethics Enforcement to implement these needs.

· Expresses the General Assembly’s intent to prevent adverse public health impacts related to the emergence of large populations of floodwater mosquitoes and encourages the Division of Public Health within the Department of Health and Human Services to continue working with local health departments to expedite mosquito control efforts.

· Authorizes the governor to waive the Division of Motor Vehicle fees for multiple services they offer.

· Authorizes the governor to waive the $10 fee charged by city and county building inspectors to fund the Homeowners Recovery Fund.

Today’s actions dealt with issues that were deemed emergency in nature and had to be addressed immediately. It is important to note that this is just the initial step in dealing with all of the issues resulting from Hurricane Florence. The Legislature will follow up with a Special Session on Monday, October 15th in order to consider a much broader appropriation package.


Wednesday, September 12, 2018 12:19 PM

September 11 Newsletter

If you experience a power outage at your home, please use the information below to report it.

Please follow the recommendations of our local officials. Be prepared because your safety and the safety of our emergency responders are both important and the number one priority. If we all work together, we will get through this and successfully move forward


Tuesday, September 11, 2018 10:21 AM

September 10 Newsletter

Hurricane Florence Update

In preparation for Hurricane Florence’s (Category 4) landfall later this week, I would like to send you the resources that are at your disposal for the coming days. The National Weather Service will be providing up-to-date information regarding Florence’s trajectory and intensity via Twitter, Facebook, and their website. I will be providing regular updates on the storm on Facebook, and I encourage you to keep an eye on your local news station. Below you can find the most recent projection for Hurricane Florence. I also recommend that you download the ReadyNC app on your smart phone, which will send wireless emergency alerts.

Finally, I urge that you be cautious in the next days. Please follow the recommendations of your local officials. If you live in an area calling for evacuation-EVACUATE! If you live in a low lying area, mobile home or similar structure, please seek shelter in a safe location. Florence is a very powerful storm, unlike any we have seen since Hurricane Hazel in 1954, and the damage could be severe to catastrophic. Your safety is the most important. Possessions can be replaced, but your life can’t.

 


Thursday, September 6, 2018 2:27 PM

September 6 Newsletter

New Local Film Productions

During the 2018 Short Session, I lobbied for modifications to the Film Grant Program whereby smaller productions would have the opportunity to be eligible for funding. With the assistance of Speaker of the House Tim Moore, this was done.

I appreciate the following correspondence that I received from Anthony P. Dowling, Executive Director of the North Carolina Film Coalition:

"From the Board of Directors and Senior Staff of the North Carolina Film Coalition, we applaud your efforts toward helping to continue the grand tradition of the film and television industry in North Carolina.

The folks at the North Carolina Film Coalition really appreciate the wonderful effort made on the behalf of the movie and television industry of North Carolina by the 2018 Legislative Assembly. The Legislature’s decision to lower some of the thresholds within the grant program is immensely valued by the leaders of our industry in this state.

Industry leaders understood the difficult financial decisions that had to be weighed in developing our state budget. We appreciated the process and recognized your willingness to help us grow this unique industry in a state with a long tradition of movie and television production support.

With the passage of the final 2018 Budget, your clarion votes sent a shout of encouragement to all the men and women across our state working hard to make a living for their family in the film and television production business.

On behalf of a grateful industry, we thank you greatly!"



I am very excited about the announcements that there will soon be two new productions at the local EUE/Screen Gems Studio.

"Reprisal", a Hulu television project, is expected to start filming in September and is presently seeking local background actors and dancers.

"Swamp Thing", a DC Universe streaming service series, is also scheduled to begin shooting in the Fall, and a local crew is presently being prepped for the project.

Since I went to the Legislature in 2012, I have continuously worked with the local Film Commission and EUE/Screen Gems Studio to fight for the film and television industry. This is a clean industry that not only provides jobs for the people who work at the studio, but also creates business for the various vendors that supply the studio with what is needed to make the productions. We now have a Film Grant Program that is funded at $31 million per year, recurring, with no sunset clause. I am proud of the many men and women who work in this business. I look forward to more projects coming to North Carolina, and I will continue to support this very important economic engine for our region and State.


Tuesday, August 28, 2018 2:22 PM

August 28 Newsletter

State Search and Rescue Services

During the 2017 Long Session, at the request of Wilmington Fire Department Chief Buddy Martinette, I filed House Bill 189 which changed the name of The Urban Search and Rescue Program to the State Search and Rescue Program, and requested an appropriation to support the State Program. The name was subsequently changed and the funding request was referred to the Appropriations Committee.

During the 2018 Short Session, the requested appropriation was included in the budget discussions by the Appropriations Committee for Justice and Public Safety, which I am a Chairman. I was very persistent in lobbying for these funds, and I was very pleased when both my Committee and the full Appropriations Committee approved funding in the amount of $2,300,000..

On August 21, 2018, I attended a presentation on behalf of the seven search and rescue teams across the State, which included a demonstration of the various equipment that has been and will be purchased with the $2,300,000. I was also very honored to receive an award for my efforts in obtaining this funding.

 

I am extremely proud of the men and women who serve on the State Search and Rescue Teams and risk their lives to help those who need assistance during emergency situations. I am so glad that I was able to play a part in obtaining this very necessary funding for this absolutely fantastic and important program.


Monday, August 27, 2018 6:35 PM

August 27 Newsletter

Discussions about GenX and other Emerging Compounds

United State Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

I previously attended and spoke at the EPA Per- and Poly fluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) community engagement in Fayetteville, North Carolina. It was very beneficial for me to hear public comments and recommendations from those who traveled from Wilmington, as well as others effected by the GenX situation. Hopefully the EPA will use its federal authority to assist our state in addressing pollution in our drinking water resources.

Cape Fear Public Utility Authority (CFPUA)

I also previously attended and spoke at a separate CFPUA PFAS workshop in Wilmington. It was very informative to hear what CFPUA has done, as well as intends to do, in order to address the situation involving GenX and other emerging compounds. I complimented the Authority for making presentations to the House Select Committee on River Quality, of which I am the Senior Chair, whenever I requested that they do so in order to keep the Committee informed of actions that they were taking. I also expressed my appreciation that CFPUA was using the $450,000.00 appropriated in the 2018 Short Session Budget to sample water at their aquifer storage and recovery site, as well as testing temporary ion exchange and carbon treatment systems.

Letter to Governor Cooper

Per my previous Newsletter, I wrote Governor Roy Cooper a letter requesting his help in us working together to get Chemours to have an in-person discussion in Wilmington with local citizens about the situation involving GenX and other emerging compounds. In the event that Chemours refuses to do so, I asked that the Governor have the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) revoke their permit and shut them down until they until they can absolutely guarantee that they can operate without endangering the quality of our drinking water. To date, I have not received any response from Governor Cooper. This is neither a Republican problem nor a Democrat problem; but rather, a problem that affects us all. Both the Governor and DEQ have the authority to shut Chemours down. I am still hopeful that the Governor will assist me in making sure that our fellow North Carolinians have safe water to drink.


Tuesday, August 21, 2018 12:00 AM

New Hanover County Rep. Ted Davis (R-New Hanover) viewed new equipment for the state search and rescue team at Cape Fear Community College’s North Cam

WILMINGTON, NC (WECT) -

New Hanover County Rep. Ted Davis (R-New Hanover) viewed new equipment for the state search and rescue team at Cape Fear Community College’s North Campus on Tuesday.

The North Carolina General Assembly awarded $2.3 million in funding in the most recent state budget for the disaster response team. Davis is credited with leading the assembly to award the money.

Task Force 11 personnel from Wilmington and New Hanover County Fire and Task Force 9 from Fayetteville Fire showed Davis the equipment. On display were a triple stack boat trailer and some of the state’s water assets.

According to Davis, it took about two years to get the funding, but when it finally came through, he was “tickled to death.”

 

 

 

 


Monday, August 20, 2018 5:19 PM

In letter to governor, New Hanover Co. rep asks: 'What does Chemours have to hide?'

WILMINGTON, NC (WECT) - 

A New Hanover County representative who is also the senior chairman of the House Committee on River Quality has sent a letter to Governor Roy Cooper expressing concern about the Chemours Company and GenX.

In the letter addressed to Cooper, Rep. Ted Davis (R-New Hanover) expresses his disappointment in Chemours' refusal to meet with area residents to discuss GenX, an unregulated compound dumped into the Cape Fear River by Chemours at its Fayetteville Works plant.

"What does Chemours have to hide?" Davis asks in the letter. "We need answers and we deserve answers."


Monday, August 20, 2018 3:14 PM

August 20, 2018 Newsletter

Chemours Letter to the Governor

Earlier today, the following letter was delivered to Governor Roy Cooper requesting that he ask Chemours to comply with the request that they meet in Wilmington to allow questions and comments by those who have been affected by the discharge of GenX. In the event that Chemours refuses, I am asking that he revoke Chemours’s permit until they can guarantee that the plant can operate without endangering the quality of our drinking water:

 


Governor Cooper,

I represent House District 19, which is basically the southern portion of New Hanover County, in the General Assembly.

I am very disappointed that Chemours has refused a recent request by the County and the City of Wilmington to have an in-person discussion with local citizens about the situation involving GenX and other emerging compounds.

As I stated during the recent federal Environmental Protection Agency meeting in Fayetteville, what does Chemours have to hide? We need answers, and we deserve answers.

The State Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has the authority to revoke Chemours' permit and shut the plant down, but has not done so. As the Senior Chairman of the House Committee on River Quality, I have previously asked DEQ what does Chemours have to do before you cease their operations?

On behalf of all of us that are affected by discharges of GenX into our air and water, I would request that you assist us in asking Chemours to come to Wilmington in order to allow questions and comments by those individuals so affected.

In the event that Chemours refuses to do so, then I respectfully ask that you have DEQ revoke their permit and shut them down until they can absolutely guarantee that they can operate without endangering the quality of our drinking water.

While I don’t like for employees to lose their jobs, in this case it is necessary for the greater good of protecting all of those being negatively impacted by operations at the Chemours plant. The sooner Chemours eliminates the pollutants, the sooner they can return to work.

I know that you share my concern for both the environment and the safety of our fellow North Carolinians. I look forward to your response and working together in this endeavor.

Sincerely,







cc: New Hanover County Board of Comnissioners Chairman Woody White

Wilmington Mayor Billy Saffo

Attorney General Josh Stein

Department of Environmental Quality Secretary Michael Regan


Wednesday, August 15, 2018 6:18 PM

2018 Cape Fear Purple Heart Dinner

It was my pleasure to attend the 2018 Cape Fear Purple Heart Dinner on Saturday night. What a wonderful way to honor Purple Heart recipients, their families and Gold Star Mothers. I would like to thank Chairman Sheriff Ed McMahon for this inspirational event honoring the brave men and women who have so valiantly served our country.

 


Tuesday, August 7, 2018 11:52 AM

August 6, 2018 Newsletter

Opioid Overdose Response Team Kick Off Event

During the 2017 Long Session, I was honored to be asked to be one of the four Primary Sponsors of HB 243, Strengthen Opioid Misuse Prevention (STOP) Act, which passed the House and the Senate and was signed by the Governor. This was the initial legislation passed by the General Assembly to address the opioid epidemic that unfortunately exists throughout our State.

While working on HB 243, I became aware of the desire of the City of Wilmington to create a response team to hopefully rehabilitate survivors of an opioid overdose. After discussing the details with the City, I agreed to help to obtain the funding for the project. I filed and was the Primary Sponsor of HB 324, which requested $250,000 for the 2017-2018 fiscal year and $250,000 for 2018-2019 fiscal year. The funding request came before the Justice and Public Safety Appropriations Committee, of which I am a Chairman. As the Committee went through the Budget process, I was adamant that this funding needed to be approved. Fortunately, it was included in the Budget that was passed by the House and Senate.

On August 3, I attended the Kick Off Event for the Cape Fear Opioid Overdose Quick Response Team at the Wilmington City Hall and had an opportunity to discuss why I supported this project and what I did to obtain the necessary funding so the project could go forward. I am very proud of the City pursuing this worthy endeavor and I am so glad that I was able to be a part of making it happen.

 


Saturday, August 4, 2018 2:11 PM

Tech Jobs Opening in North Carolina Soar

More Good News! "Tech job openings in NC soar" as key economic sectors expand rapidly following pro-growth tax reforms "including finance, insurance, retail, and educational services, with each industry posting at least 30% more job opportunities compared to last year."


Saturday, August 4, 2018 2:08 PM

Kick off of the Opioid Quick Response Team in Wilmington

It was great to be with Mayor Saffo, other members of the North Carolina General Assembly and our law enforcement officials to kick off the Opioid Quick Response Team in Wilmington.

 


Friday, July 13, 2018 4:41 PM

July 13, 2018 Newsletter

Funding to Address the GenX Issue

During the January 10, 2018 Session of the Legislature, I introduced HB189 that contained every funding request that had been made by Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Secretary Michael S. Regan to address the issues related to per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), including GenX. This legislation passed the House by a unanimous vote; unfortunately, the Senate did not agree on this funding; so nothing was done.

Thereafter, I continued to take part in negotiations with the Senate in order to reach an appropriations agreement. During the 2018 Short Session, identical legislation was filed in the House (HB 972), and in the Senate (SB 724) that included the funding previously contained in HB 189. After further negotiations, the final funding language was included in the Budget (SB99, Appropriations Act of 2018), which I voted for.

$2,000,000 went to DEQ to provide funding to local governments for necessary expenditures that local governments may incur as a result of activities to connect affected parties to public water supplies.

$450,000 went to DEQ to provide a grant-in-aid to the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority to, among other things, perform nontargeted (unknown) compounds sampling of its finished drinking water and aquifer well.

$5,013,000 went to the Collaboratory at UNC-Chapel Hill (Collaboratory) to manage and implement the investigation of nontargeted compounds in the waters of our State. DEQ will continue to have the responsibility to monitor for targeted (known) compounds. DEQ will also continue to have regulatory enforcement authority.

$537,000 went to DEQ to purchase a mass spectrometer to perform targeted analysis of water samples related to discharges of PFAS.

$613,000 went to DEQ for staff to run the mass spectrometer and to purchase supplies for that machine.

$200,000 went to DEQ for positions and operations support to address permitting backlogs.

$232,950 went to DEQ for sampling and analysis of atmospheric deposition of PFAS.

$279,050 went to DEQ for sampling and analysis of PFAS in groundwater wells, soil, and sediment.

$1,010,575 went to DEQ to support sampling and analysis activities in response to the statewide sampling and analysis related to PFAS conducted by the Collaboratory, as well as addressing permitting matters. These funds are recurring, so they will be included in future budgets.

$250,000 went to DEQ for hiring additional staff as deemed necessary. These funds are also recurring, so they will be included in future budgets, and can be used to replace positions previously eliminated.

Based upon the figures enumerated above, DEQ received a total of $4,312,000 nonrecurring funds and $1,260,575 recurring funds to continue to address the issues involving PFAS, which includes GenX.

This appropriation was a very important step by the Legislature to address emerging compounds that are in our drinking water. As Senior Chair of the House Select Committee on North Carolina River Quality, I will make sure that the Committee is made aware of the progress that is being made by DEQ and the Collaboratory with this funding. In addition, the Committee will continue to work with DEQ, the Collaboratory, and others to address this and related issues.


Friday, July 13, 2018 4:40 PM

June 11, 2018 Newsletter

Report on the 2018 Short Session

Bills
During the 2018 Legislative Short Session of the General Assembly that recessed at the end of June, I was either the or a Primary Sponsor on the following Bills that passed both the House and the Senate and are now law:

SB 566, Wrightsville Beach/Wilmington Deannexation-Annexation.
This allowed the City of Wilmington and the Town of Wrightsville Beach to exchange property near the old Galleria Mall. The existing ABC store that is presently located on the property in the City of Wilmington will be removed and that property developed by the owner. A new ABC Store will be built on the property that is now in Wrightsville Beach.

HB 15, Convey State Property to Wrightsville Beach and
HB 1004, Wrightsville Beach Local Act Changes.
These 2 separate Bills will give the Town of Wrightsville Beach clear title to property located at the end of Salisbury Street adjacent to Johnnie Mercer's Pier and allow the Town to make ADA compliant improvements which will include removing the existing unenclosed gazebo; remodel the existing bathroom facilities for men and women and add changing rooms, outdoor showers and foot rinse facilities; installation of a passive recreation area that will include a sitting area with chairs, benches, swings, and a small play area for children; and adding boardwalks.

HB 945, Rape Evidence Collection Kit Tracking Act.
The State Crime Lab is current with the testing of Rape Kits that were in their possession. However, there are thousands of Rape Kits located at local law enforcement agencies throughout the State. Rules and guidelines shall be adopted for agencies required to participate in the Statewide Sexual Assault Evidence Collection Kit Tracking System. Also, protocols shall be implemented, as well as rules and guidelines adopted, to ensure that previously untested sexual assault collection kits are trackable and entered into the System. Once there is clarification as to the number of Rape Kits that actually need to be tested, as well as any additional personnel or other items that will be necessary to do the testing, the Legislature can address the funding for this program.

HB 969, Enhance Prison Security.
This Bill addresses the safety of employees working at the State prison system by addressing, among other things, malicious conduct by a prisoner. Our correction officers need to know that the Legislature recognizes the tough environment that they work in, appreciates the work that they do, and supports increased security for their safety.

HB 970, World War II Heritage Cities. This Resolution supports the efforts for the United States Congress to designate at least one American city each year as an "American World War II Heritage City" and to select Wilmington North Carolina as the first city to be so designated. This Bill hit very close to home with me because my father, who retired from the Army Reserves as a Colonel, fought under General George Patton in World War II.

SB768/HB1021, People First Language 2018.
This Bill updated the General Statutes of North Carolina by changing the phrase "mental retardation" to intellectual disability" and "the mentally retarded" to "individuals with an intellectual disability", as well as making other such amendments, as recommended by the General Statutes Commission.

The portion of SB 99, Appropriations Act of 2018 (Budget), entitled Modify Film Grant Fund.
The guidelines were changed to allow smaller productions the opportunity to be eligible for funding and larger productions to get a bigger return on their local investment. I have continued to fight for the film industry ever since I went to the House in 2012, and hopefully this new legislation will increase the film activity in North Carolina.

HB 972, Water Safety Act.
The provisions of this legislation that provided funding to address the GenX issue were also included in SB99, and I will go into greater detail in a subsequent Newsletter.

I was appointed as a House Conferee to negotiate with the Senate concerning the following Bills:
SB 99 - Appropriations Act of 2018 (Budget)
HB 361 - Support Shellfish Industry
HB 717 - Judicial Elections Changes

I successfully lobbied to obtain funding for the following:
$7,500,000 for the new Fort Fisher Museum and Visitor Center.
$100,000 for roof repair at the Fort Fisher Aquarium.
$2,300,000 for the North Carolina Search and Rescue Program.

In conclusion, I am very proud to represent House District 19 and to have the opportunity to work on behalf of my constituents.


Monday, April 30, 2018 9:40 PM

April 30 Newsletter

River Quality

The House Select Committee on North Carolina River Quality met in Raleigh on April 26, 2018.

Sheila Holman, Assistant Secretary of Environment for the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) gave an update on the response to emerging compounds, as well as responses to previous questions by the Committee.

Jim Flechtner, Executive Director for the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority presented the Final Report on the implementation of House Bill 56, GenX Response Measures.

Dr. Ralph Mead, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington (UNCW), as well as Assistant to the UNCW Chancellor Mark Lanier, presented the Final Report on the implementation of House Bill 56, GenX Responsive Measures.

After the aforementioned updates and presentations had been made, the Committee members approved the Committee Report that will be presented to the General Assembly.

As I stated at the Committee meeting, I am continuing to negotiate with the Senate to get a compromise appropriation whereby the DEQ funding set forth in House Bill 189 will be agreed upon.

I also reminded the Committee that Speaker of the House Tim Moore has extended our Committee until December 31, 2018 so we can continue to work on issues pertaining to emerging compounds.

Judicial Redistricting

The Joint Select Committee on Judicial Reform and Redistricting met in Raleigh on April 27, 2018.

We heard presentations on, and discussed, the following:

The most recent judicial redistricting proposals; incumbency data; and Map Options A, B and C for Judicial Divisions, District Court, Superior Court, and Prosecutorial Districts.

House Bill 240, General Assembly Appoint for District Court Vacancies, which is presently in the Senate Rules Committee.

House Bill 241, Special Superior Court Judgeship Appointed by the General Assembly, which is also presently in the Senate Rules Committee.

No votes were taken.

Teacher Pay Facts

The following facts set the record straight about teacher pay in North Carolina:

According to 2017 National Education Association data, NC had the fastest rising teacher pay in the U.S.

According to 2018 National Education Association data, NC has the 2nd fastest rising teacher pay in the U.S.

The average teacher pay is now $50,000.

The starting teacher pay is now $35,000.

The teacher pay increase scheduled for the 2018 legislative short session budget is 6.5%.

As a result, the total teacher pay increase for the 2017-18 biennium will be a total of 11%.

This will provide a fifth consecutive annual teacher pay raise since 2014.


Monday, April 23, 2018 9:28 PM

April 23 Newsletter

Film Discussion

As a former County Commissioner, and since being a State Legislator, I have been a leading proponent for the film industry. I am honored to have previously received a Legislative Award from the NC Metropolitan Mayors Coalition because of my continued efforts to keep the film industry in North Carolina.

During the 2017 Legislative Long Session, I successfully lobbied for the $31 million recurring funding for the present Film Grant Program.

On April 5, I met with EUE Screen Gems Studios Executive Vice-President Bill Vassar, Jr. and Wilmington Regional Film Commission Director Johnny Griffin to discuss the current Film Grant and what additional actions that can be taken to bring projects back to Wilmington.

Occupancy Tax Discussions

On April 20, I participated in the second meeting with representatives from New Hanover County, Wilmington, Wrightsville Beach, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach, the Tourism Development Authority, and the Wilmington & Beaches Convention & Visitors Bureau to discuss the Room Occupancy Tax collection and distribution.

These meetings have provided a great opportunity for those involved to have frank face-to-face discussions about what we need to do to obtain a steady funding source for beach nourishment and shallow-inlet dredging, because tourism and water-related activities are such an important economic engine for our coastal area.

Student Physical Safety Working Group

As I have previously stated, I have been appointed to the House Select Committee on School Safety. That Committee has been divided into two Subcommittees, the Student Physical Safety Working Group, which I have been appointed to, and the Mental Health Working Group.

The first meeting of the Student Physical Safety Working Group was on April 17, 2018 and included presentations by:

Joe Haas, Executive Director of the NC Christian Schools Association;
Chip Hughes, Former Chairman of the Governor's Task Force on Safer Schools;
Mike Anderson, Community Development and Training Manager for the NC Center for Safer Schools, Department of Public Instruction;
Sheriff Samuel S. Page, Rockingham County; and
Sheriff Asa B. Bock, Carteret County.

After the presentations, there was a discussion by the members of the Working Group. Topics included:

How to get the best qualified individuals to apply for Student Resource Officer (SRO) positions and for them to have the required proper training and the necessary equipment against armed assailants;
The ratio of the number of students to the number of SROs;
Cameras operated by the schools with a direct feed to 911 Communication Systems;
School staff and faculty to have uniform training and a uniform response plan across the State; and
Schools to have at least an annual lock down drill.

Each Working Group will have at least one more meeting and will focus on developing a concrete set of proposals for consideration by the full Committee before the 2018 Short Session begins in May.


Thursday, April 5, 2018 6:54 PM

April 2, 2018 Newsletter

House Select Committee on School Safety

The House Select Committee on School Safety had its initial meeting in Raleigh on March 21, 2018.

We heard presentations from the following:
Kym Martin, Center for Safer Schools;
Sheriff Robert Holland, Task Force for Safer Schools (Task Force) Chairman;
John Dorman, NC Emergency Management and member of the Task Force;
Jody Marks, State Bureau of Investigation Senior Analyst;
Elliott Smith, State Bureau of Investigation Acting Special Agent in Charge;
Greta Metcalf, Meridian Behavioral Health Services and Chair of the Mental Health Committee of the Task Force;
Dr. Jim Deni, NC School Psychologists Association;
Carolina Daily, 8th grade teacher and Vice-Chair of the Task Force;
Sarah Strickland and Kiara Thaxton, high-school students and members of the Task Force.

Following the presentations, there was a discussion by the Committee members. Topics included upgrading older schools to prevent easy access; allowing qualified individuals such as retired law enforcement officers and military police to be at schools with weapons; bullying, including cyber-bullying; gangs; mental health needs and funding to address those needs; students who are physically or sexually abused at home; students whose parents abuse alcohol or drugs; school bus safety; and supervision of suspended students.

The Committee will continue to meet and gather information so that the proper legislation can hopefully be enacted by the Legislature to address this very serious problem.

House Select Committee on North Carolina River Quality

The House Select Committee on North Carolina River Quality met in Raleigh on March 22, 2018.

Sheila Holman, Assistant Secretary of Environment for the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) gave an update on the response to emerging compounds, as well as responses to previous questions by the Committee.

Part of the discussion concerned previous suggestions that either the General Assembly or DEQ should cease operations at the Chemours Plant located near Fayetteville, North Carolina due to additional discharges of GenX.

Staff clarified that the General Assembly does not have the authority to single out a particular business to revoke their permit, but rather, the General Assembly gave the regulatory agency, DEQ, that authority.

Staff further clarified that if DEQ proceeds to revoke the permit in order to shut down a particular business, it must give that business a 60-day Notice of Permit Revocation, which states the specific reasons for taking such action. During that 60 days, if the business satisfactorily addresses and remedies the specific reasons, no further action will be taken by DEQ. However, if the business does not take any remedial action, or any action taken by the business does not satisfactorily remedy the stated reasons, an Administrative Hearing will be held. That Administrative decision can be appealed to a Superior Court for a Hearing, that decision can be appealed to the North Carolina Court of Appeals, and that decision could be appealed to the North Carolina Supreme Court. DEQ explained that this lengthy process is why they will not issue a 60-day Notice of Permit Revocation until they are satisfied that they have sufficient justification for doing so that should prevail during the aforementioned process. I cautioned DEQ that if that burden is met concerning the Chemours Plant, they should not hesitate to proceed accordingly.

After the Committee meeting had adjourned, the Committee and members of the media had the opportunity to tour DEQ's Water Sciences and Air Quality Lab Complex in Raleigh. We got to see and hear about the different types of equipment that are presently being used, as well as hear various employees explain the processes that take place in analyzing the samples that are submitted. Also, there was discussion about what else could be done if DEQ had the high resolution mass spectrometer that DEQ requested, funding for which was included in the House version of HB189, and the Senate did not agree upon that provision.


Sunday, April 1, 2018 11:33 AM

March 29, 2018 Newsletter-Highlights From January To Date

March 29, 2018 Newsletter

Highlights From January To Date

 

In addition to various Committee meetings that I attended in Raleigh, I had the opportunity to be involved in the following:

On January 13, I attended the Annual Meeting of the Friends of Fort Fisher, where I was recognized again for obtaining the initial funding of $400,000 for advanced planning for a new Fort Fisher Visitor Center/Museum and for the subsequent funding of $5,000,000 to be applied to the construction of the new facility.

On January 16, I attended the annual Pleasure Island Chamber of Commerce meeting, where I had an opportunity to discuss what had happened during the 2017 Legislative Long Session, what I anticipated would occur during the 2018 Legislative Short Session, and issues of importance to Carolina Beach and Kure Beach.

On January 26, I participated in a filmed documentary about the Venus Fly Trap and my legislation to make the theft of a Venus Fly Trap a Class H Felony. I am honored to have previously received the North Carolina Land Trust "Legislator of the Year" Award as a result of the enactment of at legislation.

On February 1, I attended the annual Boy Scout Fundraising lunch in Wilmington. I enjoyed hearing from the key note speaker, former basketball great Ralph Sampson, and having the opportunity to contribute to such an outstanding organization.

On February 28, I participated in a conference call with State Attorney General Josh Stein about various issues. I am very proud to have been a Primary Sponsor of HB 243, Strengthen Opioid Misuse Prevention Act, which was the first step of the Legislative effort to address the present crisis of opioid use and addiction in our State. I am also very proud to have been the Primary Sponsor of HB 324, Pilot Project to Treat Opiate Overdose, which was included in the Budget, and provided funding of $500,000 for the City of Wilmington to develop and implement a pilot project to establish a Quick Response Team to address follow-up treatment for opiate and heroin overdose victims.


On March 2, I participated in an initial meeting with representatives from New Hanover County, Wilmington, Wrightsville Beach, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach, the Tourism Development Authority, and the Wilmington & Beaches Convention & Visitors Bureau to discuss the Room Occupancy Tax collection and distribution. I am honored to have previously received awards from the North Carolina Travel Industry Association and the North Carolina Travel and Tourism Coalition for my legislative work involving Room Occupancy Tax issues.

On March 16, I attended the Cape Fear Realtor's Legislative Luncheon where I had an opportunity to discuss and answer questions about matters that are important to the real estate business.

Bar-B-Q and Chowder

During December of 2017, I attended the swearing-in ceremony of Kure Beach Mayor Craig Bloszinsky, Commissioner Allen Oliver and Commissioner John Ellen. I also attended and had the honor of swearing in Carolina Beach Mayor Joe Benson, Council member LeAnn Pierce and Council member JoDan Garza at their ceremony.

On March 3, I had the opportunity to be a Judge with LeAnn Pierce at the Step Up for Soldiers Bar-B-Q Cook-off in Carolina Beach. Besides sampling some fantastic Bar-B-Q, I also had an opportunity for good fellowship with veterans who have earned our respect and admiration.

On March 17, I had the opportunity to be a Judge with Joe Benson and LeAnn Pierce (for my 4th time) at the Carolina Beach Inlet Association Chowder Cook-off also at Carolina Beach. Besides sampling some terrific chowder, I also had an opportunity to discuss the important work of the Inlet Association. I have been working with the Association for years, and was proud to have previously been the Primary Sponsor of legislation for funding of $1,000,000 for shallow inlet dredging in New Hanover County.


Tuesday, March 13, 2018 2:57 PM

March 12 Newsletter

Visionary Award

I am honored to have received the 2017 Visionary Award in Optometry by nceyes “in recognition of my outstanding commitment to the visual health and well-being of North Carolina citizens.”


2017 Jobs Champion

I have been recognized as a Jobs Champion by the North Carolina Chamber because my votes for pro-growth policies during the 2017 Long Session demonstrated a commitment to preserving and enhancing a positive climate for business and job creation in North Carolina. This is the 3rd year in a row that I have received this recognition.

Pro-jobs legislation is based around strengthening the Four Pillars of a Secure Future: Education and Talent Supply, Competitive Business Climate, Entrepreneurship and Innovation, and Infrastructure and Growth Leadership.

I will continue my efforts toward North Carolina having positive economic growth strategies that will attract businesses and create good jobs, because this definitely has an important economic impact on those who live in House District 19, as well as the rest of our State.


Wednesday, March 7, 2018 8:09 PM

March 5 Newsletter

Committee Appointment

I have been appointed by Speaker of the House Tim Moore to the House Select Committee on School Safety.

This bipartisan Committee consists of 47 House members.

The responsibilities of the Committee include examining the current safety standards and procedures throughout North Carolina’s elementary, middle and high schools and making recommendations on statutory and non-statutory changes in order to ensure the highest level quality of safety for North Carolina students, teachers and other school personnel.

In light of recent devastating national events that have threatened school safety, the Committee may consult with local governments and Local Education Agencies (LEAs) on processes and procedures that have proven to be useful in unsafe situations in their schools. The Committee may also seek information from experts in the fields of education, law enforcement, mental health and crisis management, as well as any others deemed appropriate. In addition, the Committee may identify other relevant topics to enhancing and ensuring safety in our schools.

I am honored to have been selected to serve on this Committee, and I look forward to working with my fellow Representatives in addressing a safe environment for our schools.


Wednesday, February 28, 2018 10:52 PM

February 28, 2018 Newsletter

House Select Committee on North Carolina River Quality

The House Select Committee on North Carolina River Quality met on February 21, 2018 and featured the following:

Sheila Holman, Assistant Secretary for Environment, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), gave an update on response to emerging compounds and responses to previous questions from Committee members, including: spikes in GenX concentrations near the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority plant in December, 2017; potential use of private drinking water well filtration systems; and an update on enforcement actions taken. She was assisted in responses to further Committee questions by Linda Culpepper, Deputy Director, Division of Water Resources, DEQ; Michael Scott, Director, Division of Waste Management, DEQ; and Mike Pjetraj, Division of Air Quality, DEQ.

Jim Flechtner, Executive Director, and Frank Styers, Chief Operations Officer, from the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority gave an interim report on the implementation of House Bill 56—GenX Response Measures. A report was also given on the spikes in GenX concentrations near the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority Plant in December, 2017.

Dr. Robert Keiber, Professor and Graduate Coordinator, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington (UNCW) also gave an interim report on the implementation of HB 56—GenX Response Measures. He provided initial findings in regard to testing of the water column and updates on the collection and analysis of sediments, as well as plans for research and biodegradation. He also gave a brief update on the work being done on bioaccumulation by marine biologists at the UNCW Center for Marine Science.

Mark Strynar, Physical Scientist from the National Exposure Research Laboratory, United States Environmental Protection Agency and Andy Miller, Director of Legislative Affairs, DEQ, updated Committee members on the use and availability of high resolution mass spectrometers for detection and analysis of GenX and other emerging contaminants. Of particular interest was Mr. Strynar’s statement that the high resolution mass spectrometer that DEQ requested and was funded in the House version of HB189 was exactly what DEQ needed to detect and analyze GenX and other emerging contaminants.

The final discussion by the Committee concerned the differences between HB189 that was passed unanimously by the House as compared to the subsequent Senate PCS to HB189. I previous provided a detailed summary of my presentation to the Committee in my February 22, 2018 Newsletter. The Committee members supported the provisions of the House version of HB189, especially with DEQ having its own mass spectrometer. This matter was left open for further discussion by the Committee at a future date.


Thursday, February 22, 2018 10:30 PM

February 22, 2018 Newsletter

House Select Committee on North Carolina River Quality and the January 10, 2018 Session

As stated in a previous newsletter, five short-term legislative policy recommendations for consideration by the House were approved at the last meeting of the Committee on January 4, 2018.

After that Committee meeting, I continued to work with Speaker of the House Tim Moore’s staff, as well as the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to develop an appropriation request to add to the proposed five legislative policy recommendations that had been approved by the Committee.

During this time, DEQ was corresponding with both the House Republican and Senate Republican leadership about what it would like the funding request to contain. The House Republican leadership also kept the House Democrat leadership informed of what was being done because it was very important to have bipartisan support and make this a joint effort.

The discussions and correspondence between the House, the Senate and DEQ continued right up to the January 10, 2018 Session date. The five legislative policy recommendations were put into HB189, titled Short-Term Response to Emerging Contaminants, as well as an initial funding request.

HB189 was heard first in the House Appropriations Committee. As the lead Primary Sponsor of the Bill, I presented it to the Committee and also successfully presented an Amendment for an additional funding request. The amended Bill received a unanimous vote for a Favorable Report and it moved forward to the House floor for consideration.

At this point, HB189 contained the following $2,341,736.00 funding requests, which was everything that DEQ Secretary Michael S. Regan had requested:

1. $537,000 in nonrecurring funds to DEQ to purchase an ultra-high resolution mass spectrometer to identify GenX and other emerging contaminants.
2. $479,736.00 in recurring funds to DEQ of which $414,736.00 was for the five trained positions necessary to operate the ultra-high resolution mass spectrometer and $60,000.00 for operational expenses (maintenance, etc.).
3. $813,000.00 in nonrecurring funds to DEQ for the Division of Water Resources to address water quality sampling related to GenX and other emerging contaminations and to address permitting backlogs.
4. $232,950.00 in nonrecurring funds to DEQ for the Division of Air Quality to sample and analyze the atmospheric deposition of GenX and other emerging contaminants.
5. $279,050.00 in nonrecurring funds to DEQ for the Division of Water Management to sample and analyze for GenX and other emerging contaminants in groundwater wells, soil, and sediment.

HB189 was then heard on the House floor. I explained each funding request, and I emphasized that DEQ was in support of the legislation. Others spoke in favor of the Bill.

The vote was 116 in favor and 0 in opposition. I was extremely proud that every Democrat and Republican Representative supported the Bill because it showed a very strong bipartisan commitment to take the necessary steps to provide safe drinking water for those who live in our State. I was also extremely proud because no one could remember a previous unanimous vote on an environmental Bill in the House.

Unfortunately, the Senate chose not to consider the Bill before the January 10 Session ended.

 

House Select Committee on North Carolina River Quality and the February 9, 2018 Session

I was notified that HB189 was going to be heard in the Senate Committee on Agriculture/Environment/Natural Resources on Wednesday, February 7, 2018. I was also notified that I would not be asked to speak on the content of HB189 as passed by the House; a Proposed Committee Substitute (PCS) titled Water Safety Act, would be considered instead; and that Senator Michael Lee would be presenting the PCS to the Committee. When I had an opportunity to review the PCS, I discovered that it basically replaced the original House version with different language proposed by Senator Lee. I attended the Senate Committee, listened to the presentation, and heard the debate. The PCS received a Favorable Report, but it was not a unanimous vote.

The PCS to HB189 was then heard by the Senate during their Session on Friday, February 9, 2018. I attended the Senate Session, listened to the presentation, and heard the debate. Two Amendments were added to the PCS, neither of which received a unanimous vote. The amended PCS passed the Senate, but it was not a unanimous vote.

The Senate PCS then went back to the House for a concurrence vote. The next House Session was scheduled for Tuesday, February 13. If the House voted to concur, the legislation would have passed both chambers and been sent to the Governor, who could have vetoed it. On the other hand, if the House had voted not to concur, each chamber could select conferees and the matter would go to conference to see if the differences could be worked out. Since the House had not had an opportunity to discuss the Senate PCS, the decision was made to not go directly to a concurrence vote on February 13; but rather, refer HB189 to the House Select Committee on North Carolina River Quality, so it could be properly vetted by House members.

 

A Comparison of the House version of HB189 and the Senate PCS to HB 189

1. A Science Advisory Board (Board) had been previously established by the Secretary of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the Secretary of Health and Human Services (DHHS) for the purpose of achieving and maintaining clear air, water and land, with particular attention to be paid to emerging contaminants. The House version of HB189 directed DHHS to consult with the Board on DHHS’s process for establishing health goals for contaminants. The Senate PCS eliminated this provision and directed DHHS to consult with, among others, the North Carolina Policy Collaboratory at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Collaboratory) on DHHS’s process for the establishment of health goals for GenX and other emerging contaminants.

2. The Senate PCS directed DEQ to cooperate with any United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Audit of DEQ’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit Program. It is my understanding that DEQ does this.

3. The Senate PCS directed DEQ to review the NPDES permitting program from October 19, 1975, which would be 43 years. It is my understanding that Chemours began its operations in Fayetteville, North Carolina in 1976.

4. The Senate PCS directed DEQ to coordinate and share water quality data with Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. This provision is identical to language contained in the House version of HB189.

5. As previously stated, the House version of HB189 had an appropriation of $1,016,736.00, of which $537,000.00 was for DEQ to acquire an ultra-high resolution mass spectrometer; $414,736.00 was for five trained positions necessary to operate the spectrometer; and $60,000.00 was for operational expenses. DEQ was requesting to have their own mass spectrometer, in part because of the length of time it took between sending the samples to the USEPA in George for testing and getting the results back. However, the Senate PCS eliminated all of this specific funding.

Unlike the House version of HB189, the Senate PCS stated that mass spectrometers exist throughout the University of North Carolina System and should be made available for the analysis of water quality sampling with respect to the discharge of GenX and other emerging contaminants. In the event that the USEPA no longer provided access to its analytical instrumentation for water quality sampling analysis, or DEQ determines that such analysis is not being performed in a sufficiently timely manner, the Collaboratory, and not DEQ, would be responsible for getting the water sampling done by the UNC System. In my opinion, this presents a problem because it is my understanding that only a spectrometer that would be able to test targeted and non-targeted substances for fluorinated compounds could be used; the machine would need to be made available to DEQ for at least 40 hours per week, which would limit the use of the machine by the school; and since DEQ does not presently have the trained staff, the school would have to provide their paid staff, if properly trained, to run the machines, which would limit those individuals who are being paid by the school to do DEQ’s work rather than their school duties.

Further, the Senate PCS states that the Collaboratory, rather than DEQ, would be responsible for conducting research with the UNC System dealing with contamination of private wells; household water filter removing such compounds; improved water quality sampling and analysis techniques; data interpretation, and potential mitigation measures.

6. As previously stated, the House version of HB189 had an appropriation of $232,950.00 to DEQ for the Division of Air Quality to sample and analyze the atmospheric deposition of GenX and other emerging contaminants. However, the Senate PCS eliminated this specific funding.

7. As previously stated, the House version of HB189 had an appropriation of $279,050.00 to DEQ for the Division of Waste Management to sample and analyze for GenX and other emerging contaminants in groundwater wells, soil, and sediment. However, the Senate PCS eliminated this specific funding.

8. As previously stated, the House version of HB189 had an appropriation of $813,000.00 to DEQ for the Division of Water Resources to address water quality sampling related to GenX and other emerging contaminants and to address permitting backlogs. In addition, there were no limitations on this funding.

The Senate PCS also had an identical non-recurring appropriation amount of $813,000.00, but this funding was to DEQ for the limited use by the Division of Water Resources for the collection of air and water quality samples related to GenX and other emerging compounds that are delivered to the USEPA or an entity designated to perform analysis of samples by the Collaboratory and to address NCDES permitting backlogs. First, it is my understanding that the Division of Air Quality, and not the Division of Water Resources, is responsible for obtaining air quality samples. Second, it is my understanding that the limitation that only samples that may be delivered to the USEPA are a small portion of the overall sampling that DEQ is doing.

9. So while the Senate PCS has a total appropriation of $2,400,000.00, as compared to the total appropriation of $2,341,736.00 in the House version of HB189, what are the permitted uses of that increased funding?

I have previously discussed what $813,000.00 would be used for. As to the remaining balance of $1,587,000, this funding could be used for the following limited purposes:

DEQ complying with any USEPA audit of its NPDES permit program, which I understand that DEQ is already doing;

DEQ reviewing 43 years of NPDES permits;

DEQ sharing water quality data with other states; and

I am not certain whether Section 6(d) of the Senate PCS requires any use of this funding by the Collaboratory.

 

Conclusion

After comparing the House version of HB189 and the Senate PCS, the only logical conclusion that I can make is that the Senate PCS does not begin to give DEQ the flexibility, the control and the funding that it needs to successfully address safe drinking water for those who live in our State.

By the Senate PCS remaining in this House Committee for further discussion, it is my sincere hope that the House and the Senate can have a positive dialogue in order to work out the differences in our respective legislation. Because, at the end of the day, we need to remember that it is the people of North Carolina who we represent who need to be protected by having access to safe drinking water.


Wednesday, February 14, 2018 7:33 PM

February 14, 2018 Newsletter

House Bill 90: Changes to Education and Election Laws

The House and the Senate have agreed upon language in House Bill 90 that will address the following educational issues:

Delays implementation of mandatory class size requirements set to take effect in school year 2018-19.

Establishes a 4-year phase-in of class size requirements for K-3rd grade.

Creates an allotment category for K-5 program enhancement teachers separate from the classroom teacher allotment, thereby protecting enhancement teachers and classes.

Establishes a $61,359,225 funding stream to begin in school year 2018-19 that builds to full-funding of enhancement teachers along the same time period as the phase-in requirements take effect.

Allows LEA flexibility to transfer positions into the classroom teacher allotment in order to meet the needs of the schools or LEA.

Ensures that LEA’s in counties impacted by the Atlantic Coast Pipeline (ACP) are the sole recipients of the $57,800,000 funding generated by the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) associated with the ACP. This money provides critically needed one-time money for the affected counties for adjustments desperately needed to insure good student outcomes.

Clarifies access to Personal Education Savings Accounts for students with special needs.

Establishes a statutory appropriation of $82,000,000 for fiscal year 2019-2020 and $91,400,000 for fiscal year 2020-2021 for NC Pre-K that will fully fund the waiting list for this vital program that helps insure that kids begin school ready to learn.

When the House voted, 104 members voted in favor of the Bill and 12 members voted in opposition. Of the 12 that voted no, 11 were Democrats and 1 was a Republican. I supported this bi-partisan effort that is critical to the education of our children. I applaud the members of the House and the Senate for being able to successfully negotiate a compromise of their differences concerning the contents of this legislation.

The Bill now goes to the Governor for his signature, and hopefully, he will sign it into law.


Thursday, February 8, 2018 11:01 PM

February 8, 2018 Newsletter

House Select Committee on North Carolina River Quality

The House Select Committee on North Carolina River Quality has been meeting monthly since September, 2017.

The first meeting of the Committee featured the following:

Sheila Holman, Assistant Secretary for Environment, Department of Environmental Quality spoke on the regulatory history of the Chemours Fayetteville Works facility including:
The permitting and enforcement history of the facility at the State and Federal levels
All legal action taken by the State relative to the Chemours Fayetteville Works facility
Water quality test results for wells adjacent to the facility and efforts to address contamination
Investigation into potential air emissions

Mike Brown, Chairman of the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority Board and Frank Styers, Chief Operations Officer of the Authority spoke on the Authorities action plan to implement Section 20(a)(1) of House Bill 56 (GenX Response Measures) and reported on the GenX contamination of the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority’s aquifer storage.

Mark Lanier, Assistant to the Chancellor, and Dr. Ralph Mead, Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington spoke on UNCW’s action plan to implement Section 20 (a)(2) of House Bill 56 (GenX Response Measures).

Mark Benton, Deputy Secretary for Health Services in the Department of Health and Human Services and Zack Moore, MD, MPH, State Epidemiologist and Epidemiology Section Chief in the Division of Public Health in the Department of Health and Human Services spoke on the presence and health effects of GenX and related compounds in the Lower Cape Fear River Basin.

Tracy Skrabel, Coastal Scientist and Manager of the Southeast Regional Office of the North Carolina Coastal Federation and Dr. Lee Ferguson, Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Duke University spoke on emerging compounds and federal regulation, State regulations and regulatory gaps related to emerging compounds.

October 26, 2017

The second meeting of the Committee featured the following:

A presentation on research into emerging compounds, including explanation of targeted versus non-targeted screening and work in the Cape Fear River watershed on testing for emerging compounds by Dr. Ketlef Knappe, Professor, Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering at the North Carolina State University.

The Department of Environmental Quality gave an update on response to emerging compounds and responses to previous questions, which included the latest surface water and groundwater monitoring results; information on air emissions from the Chemours Fayetteville Works facility; how wastewater from the closed-loop system at the Chemours facility is disposed of; improving the disclosure process for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits; impact of inter basin transfers; and description of Departmental resources devoted to the monitoring, analysis and regulation of emerging compounds.

The presenters, all from the Department of Environmental Quality were Sheila Holman, Assistant Secretary for Environment; Linda Culpepper, Deputy Director, Division of Water Resources; Michael Scott, Director, Division of Waste Management; and Mike Abrazinskas, Director, Division of Air Quality.

The Department of Health and Human Services gave an update on response to emerging compounds and responses to previous questions, including a description of Departmental resources devoted to the monitoring, analysis, and regulation of emerging compounds; overview of research and studies that contributed to the 140 parts per trillion health goal for GenX; and a description of the Science Advisory Board and its work. The presenters from the Department of Health and Human Services were Elizabeth Cuervo Tilson, MD, MPH, State Health Director, Chief Medical Officer, Danny Staley, MS, Director of the Division of Public Health and Zack Moore, MD, MPH, State Epidemiologist and Epidemiology Section Chief, Division of Public Health.

An update was given by Jim Flechtner, Executive Director and Frank Styers, Chief Operations Officer from the Cape Fear Public Authority on the action plan to implement Section 20(a)(1) of House Bill 56 (GenX Response Measures) and testing conducted by the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority for the filtration and removal of GenX and other emerging compounds from drinking water.

Kemp Burdette, Cape Fear Riverkeeper of the Cape Fear River Watch discussed issues concerning emerging compounds.

November 30, 2017

The third meeting of the Committee featured the following:


The Department of Environmental Quality gave an update on response to emerging compounds and responses to previous questions, including: latest surface water and groundwater monitoring results; information on air emissions from the Chemours Fayetteville Works facility; enforcement actions, including enforcement actions related to an unreported chemical spill at the Chemours Fayetteville Works facility; discovery of additional emerging compounds and information on Departmental water quality monitoring. Those reporting, all from the Department of Environmental Quality, were Sheila Holman, Assistant Secretary, Linda Culpepper, Deputy Director, Division of Water Resources, Michael Scott, Director, Division of Waste Management and Mike Abraczinskas, Director, Division of Air Quality.

January 4, 2018

There was no Committee meeting during December of 2017. In lieu of a Special Session that was going to be conducted on January 10, 2018, as Senior Chair of the Committee I made the decision for the Committee to consider and vote on some short-term legislation before the 2018 Short Session began in May. Since the January 10 Session was only going to be a 1 to 2 day Session, the proposed legislation needed to be non-controversial to avoid the necessity of extended debate or additional committee hearings so that hopefully a bill containing the proposed legislation would pass both the House and the Senate in this small window of opportunity.

At the fourth meeting of the Committee on January 4, five legislative policy recommendations were approved by the Committee for hearing by the General Assembly. At that time, I stated that an appropriation might be subsequently addressed prior to any bill being considered by the legislature.

I will discuss what happened at the January 10 Session in a subsequent newsletter.


Tuesday, February 6, 2018 9:55 PM

February 6, 2018 Newsletter

Resolution Opposing Offshore Drilling

House District 19 consists of the southern portion of the City of Wilmington and the unincorporated area of New Hanover County as well as Wrightsville Beach, Carolina Beach and Kure Beach.

On January 22, 2018, the New Hanover County Board of Commissioners considered a Resolution in opposition to offshore drilling. Commissioner Chairman Woody White allowed my request to speak at the meeting. My comments included references to the previous Resolutions that had been passed by the City and the beach municipalities in opposition to offshore drilling. I asked the Board to pass their proposed Resolution so that all of the governmental entities within House District 19 would be unanimous in their opposition. The entire Board voted in favor of the Resolution.

Offshore Drilling Public Hearing

The Bureau of Ocean and Energy Management (BOEM) is planning to told only one public meeting, which will be in Raleigh, to allow public interaction and comments concerning the proposed five year plan for offshore oil and gas development off the North Carolina Coast.

On Thursday, February 1, 2018, I wrote a letter to United States Department of the Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke on behalf of House District 19. Among other things, I requested that BOEM also conduct a public meeting in Wilmington or a local beach municipality so that those affected within my House District would have the opportunity to make their voices heard on an issue that will be critical to the continuation of their wonderful quality of life.

On Friday, February 2, 2018, I was notified that Secretary Zinke was going to be in Raleigh on Saturday, February 3, and I was invited to speak with him at a private meeting. On Saturday, I attended that meeting and I had an opportunity to meet and speak with Secretary Zinke. At that time, I told him about my House District 19; that every governmental entity therein had passed a Resolution in opposition to offshore drilling; and how much it would mean to those who lived here for BOEM to conduct a public meeting in Wilmington so that they could attend and speak. Secretary Zinke was very positive about my request and stated that he would do that. Obviously, I am very excited for my constituents that this will happen, and I encourage everyone to take advantage of this opportunity when it occurs.

 


Monday, January 8, 2018 8:42 PM

Committee Appointment

January 8, 2018

I was previously appointed by the Speaker of the House Tim Moore as a Vice-Chair of the House Select Committee on Redistricting.

In addition, I have been appointed by the Speaker to the new Joint Select Committee on Judicial Reform and Redistricting. The Joint Committee is comprised of 15 House Democrat and Republican members, which will work with the Senate concerning issues involving judicial reform and redistricting. Speaker Moore stated that “this Joint Committee is an important step in our comprehensive legislative process to reaffirm the rights of the North Carolinians who deserve balanced representation, an equal voice, and full confidence in their justice system.”

In making my appointment, Speaker Moore said that he was confident that I will have much to offer to this Joint Committee and will be effective and diligent in my service to our State.

I am honored by the confidence that the Speaker has shown in me, I appreciate the opportunity to serve on this Joint Committee, and I look forward to working with the Senate and my follow Committee members.

The first meeting of the Joint Committee is scheduled for Thursday, January 11, 2018 in Raleigh.


Tuesday, December 19, 2017 8:34 PM

December 18, 2017 Newsletter

The North Carolina Sheriffs’ Association Recognizes Representative Ted Davis, Jr. with Defender of Public Safety Award

I have been recognized by the North Carolina Sheriffs’ Association with a 2017 Defender of Public Safety award, calling me “a strong advocate for the pursuit of justice” and advancing the legislative priorities of that law enforcement organization.

Sheriff Carson H. Smith Jr., President of the Association, said “Representative Davis dedicated time and effort during the Session advocating for law enforcement issues important to the Association which impact the office of sheriff, local communities and the State. Representative Davis took a leadership role in advancing the legislative priorities of the North Carolina Sheriffs’ Association which represents all 100 sheriffs in the State. As a result, our sheriffs are better equipped to protect the lives, liberties and property of North Carolina’s citizens.”

During the 2017 legislative session, the General Assembly enacted dozens of laws that had a direct impact on law enforcement and public safety in North Carolina.

My legislative District #19 is served by Sheriff Ed McMahon of New Hanover County.

I truly appreciate the honor and recognition this award confers on behalf of the brave officers who put their lives on the line to protect our local communities, and I am looking forward to working with the North Carolina Sheriffs’ Association during the upcoming 2018 Session to continue keeping our State safe and strong.


Tuesday, November 28, 2017 8:38 AM

November 27, 2017 Newsletter

2017 Legislative Business Ratings


The North Carolina FreeEnterprise Foundation has released their 2017 Legislative Business Ratings. I am honored to have received a 92.9 rating, which is the eight-highest among the 120 members of the House of Representatives and the highest among our local Legislative delegation.

The ratings are based on objective and subjective criteria related to work that the Legislature has done on issues relating to free enterprise and business development.

In a related matter, I have enjoyed being on the House Commerce and Job Development Committee, as well as the Joint Legislative Economic Development and Global Engagement Committee, because it gives me the unique opportunity to have both input and involvement concerning issues and legislation pertaining to economic and job development.

Business in North Carolina

According to October figures released by the Department of Commerce, over the last 12 months, the State economy has added 91,964 jobs and the number of people unemployed has decreased by 47,385.

North Carolina was rated the fourth fastest household income growth in the nation during 2016 according to the U.S. Census Bureau; the fifth best state for business for 2017 by CNBC; the fifth best climate for business by corporate executives according to a 2017 report released by Development Counselors International; the best state for starting a business according to a recent study conducted by Fit Small Business; and the best state for IT employment growth and the percentage of women in that workforce according to N. C. Technology Association’s 2017 report. In addition, North Carolina won the 2017 Prosperity Cup (formally known as the Top Competitive States) by Site Select Magazine.

I am very proud of the numerous accomplishments that have occurred in our great State under Republican leadership.


Tuesday, November 21, 2017 8:47 PM

November 21, 2017 Newsletter

Recent Events Involving The State Prison System and Pollution of Our Sources of Drinking Water

I am a Co-Chairman of the Joint Legislative Oversight Committee on Justice and Public Safety, which will have the responsibility during the present legislative interim of addressing the recent events involving the State Prison System.

Below are the opening remarks that I made when I chaired the November 16, 2017 Committee meeting. I want to share these comments with you in view of the importance of this situation.

“After the terrible attack and escape attempt at Pasquotank Correctional Facility, the members and staff of the General Assembly join all North Carolinians in keeping the victims of this tragedy, their friends, families and coworkers, in our prayers.

For the officers and employees who were injured and to Geoffrey Howe, Veronica Darden, Justin Smith, and Wendy Shannon—who were killed in the attack—our state can never repay their families for the cost of this terrible violence done to them at their place of work.

These North Carolinians were trying to earn a living like the rest of us—just like Sgt. Meggan Callahan, who was killed by an inmate at Bertie Correctional Institution in April of this year.

As we remember the sacrifice of those who were senselessly killed, and keep the service of all the brave correctional officers who protect North Carolinians close to our hearts, on behalf of the people of this state, I extend our deepest gratitute to those officers and employees working in such a dangerous line of duty so that we may be safe.

I’d like to provide several important updates for this committee on the legislature’s ongoing commitment to improve salaries, staffing levels and safety of those working in our state prisons in the wake of the attack at Pasquotank.

There are multiple, concurrent investigations taking place into the escape attempt and fatal attacks at Pasquotank. We are waiting for the officials conducting that investigation to share what they can, when they can, with us. Until then, it’s important we allow those investigations to move forward unimpeded so investigators and prosecutors can serve justice to the perpertrators.

After meeting with Department of Public Safety Secretary Eric Hooks and discussing the need for a comprehensive review of state prison policy with our fellow General Assembly members, it is apparent that this committee—the Joint Legislative Oversight Committee on Justice and Public Safety—is the appropriate forum for that mission, because:

1. This committee allows both House and Senate to collaborate on a comprehensive
review of the state prison policy

2. This committee has a large, expert central staff team accustomed to working
together on member and administrative requests on corrections issues

3. This committee has overseen the restructuring and consolidation of the Department of Public Safety and is well-prepared to received information and consider potential reforms and needs to serve our state prison officers.

Our committee is working with the administration to prepare a comprehensive review of state prison staffing and policies throughout this legislative interim. To assist in that effort, I asked the members of this committee to submit to the chairs, clerks and central staff any questions or information requests you have for the Department of Public Safety or our legislative divisions.

We have already started to work on those inquiries and appreciate your help providing them in advance so staff can consolidate and collaborate on those efforts to help us learn as much as possible and develop potential proposals for reform from our review of state prisons through this committee.

Finally, I want to emphasize this is an ongoing commitment to improving salaries and staffing levels to help protect the brave correctional officers who are counting on us to respond to the tragedies at Bertie and Pasquotank Correctional facilities.

There is much more to be done and I appreciate the willingness of so many members and staff who have reached out to me and are ready to continue taking action and committing further to policies and budgets that will benefit North Carolinians working in our state prisons.”

I will keep you posted as to future developments.

Separate and apart from the above, I have been serving as the Senior Chair of the House Select Committee on NC River Quality, which was formed by Speaker of the House Tim Moore to investigate the pollution of the rivers that are the sources of our drinking water. That investigation has expanded to include contamination of wells and air pollution. In December, I will be providing you with a summary of what the Committee has been doing to date, as well as a projection as to how the Committee will be proceeding in 2018. I want you to be aware of the actions that this Committee has taken, and will be taking, on your behalf to protect both you and your family.

This is one of the most important issues of my tenure as a Legislator and I will be thouroughly addressing it through this House Committee during the present legislative interium, until we hopefully have a result that affords the best possible solution to our concerns regarding our water quality.


Monday, September 18, 2017 8:26 PM

Committee Appointment

I have been appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Tim Moore, as a Co-Chair of the Joint Select Committee on Judicial Funding.

I am very honored to have been selected to this position because this Joint Select Committee was just established in the Budget that was passed during the 2017 Long Session of the General Assembly.

The Committee is comprised of 10 members, of which 5 are appointed by the House and 5 are appointed by the Senate.

This Committee will meet during the 2017-2018 Interim and study the effects of enacting the first editions of Senate Bill 635 (having to do with providing judicial assistants to judges) and Senate Bill 636 (which provides a 20% pay increase to the judicial branch), as well as substantially similar legislation. The Committee will then submit a final report on the results of its study, including any proposed legislation, to the General Assembly.

I appreciate the opportunity given to me and I look forward to working with my Senate Co-Chair and the other members of this Committee.


Friday, September 8, 2017 7:44 AM

Committee Appointment

I have been appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Tim Moore, as a Co-Chair of the Joint Legislative Oversight Committee on Justice and Safety.

The Committee is comprised of 11 members from the House, as well as Advisory members (non-voting). There are also 11 members from the Senate. The duties of the Committee include seeing that Agencies and Departments are spending money that was appropriated by the General Assembly properly and efficiently, as well as implementing policy passed by the General Assembly.

This committee will meet during the 2017-2018 Interim and hear various topics related to justice and public safety, including presentations by both individuals and agencies; reports; and possible legislation to be introduced during the 2018 Short Session. The Committee will then give a report to the General Assembly.

I appreciate the opportunity given to me and I look forward to working with my Co-Chairs and the other members of this Committee.


Friday, September 1, 2017 4:40 PM

August 31, 2017 Interim Newsletter

I have been appointed to the following Committees by the Speaker of the House, Tim Moore.

House Select Committee on Legislative Redistricting

This Committee was given the responsibility of determining what criteria would be used in determining how the new House Legislative Districts would be drawn, and then approve the new House District Map that was drawn based upon those criteria. The criteria adopted by the Committee included equal population (79,462 individuals is the ideal number for a House District with a plus or minus five percent margin); continuity (continuity for different areas of land by water is sufficient); county groupings and traversals (try to eliminate split counties as much as possible); and compactness. After the initial House District Map had been drawn and made public, the Committee conducted public hearings on August 22, 2017 in Raleigh and in six other locations throughout the State to receive public comment. On August 25, 2017 the Committee met to consider changes that had been made to the original House District Map and various amendments that were requested. On August 28, 2017 the House voted and approved the new House District Map. This Map was subsequently approved by the Senate. The Map will now be considered by a three judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit and the panel may either adopt the Map; reject the Map and refer it to someone else to draw; or reject the Map and draw it themselves. I anticipate that whatever decision is made by this panel will be appealed to the United States Supreme Court.

Environmental Review Commission

As a result of the GenX situation involving the Cape Fear River, the Environmental Review Commission was given the responsibility of investigating the pollution of the River and the request by Governor Roy Cooper for additional funding in the amount of $2.6 million for the NC Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) to address water and public health and the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to address permitting and water quality monitoring. I was not a member of the Environmental Review Commission, which is comprised of legislative members of both the House and the Senate. However, I was appointed as an Advisory Member of the Commission because of my being a member of the local New Hanover County Delegation and my concern for our local residents having safe drinking water. On August 23, 2017 the Commission met in Wilmington to hear, among other things, comments from the public concerning the situation with pollution in the Cape Fear River. After hearing public comment, the Commission passed a motion to immediately move forward with local and state agencies working together toward a solution of the pollutants in the River. During my comments to the Commission, I supported additional funding to the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority and the University of North Carolina at Wilmington for local assistance in addressing pollutants in the Cape Fear River and monitoring the water quality of the River. I did this because of my sincere concern that immediate attention must be given to the quality of our drinking water. The Commission plans to have a subsequent meeting to continue to address this situation and the Governor’s request.

House Select Committee on Judicial Redistricting

I was selected as a Vice Chairman of this Committee, which will have the responsibility of redrawing the Judicial maps as it relates to District Court Districts, Superior Court Districts and Prosecutorial Districts. The first meeting of this Committee has been scheduled for Tuesday, September 12, 2017 in Raleigh.

House Bill 56

Today, House Bill 56 entitled “Amend Environmental Laws” was heard during Session and passed. Part of that legislation was the appropriation from the Contingency and Emergency Fund the sum of $435,000, of which $185,000 is to the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority who shall, in coordination with Brunswick County Public Utilities, Pender County Utilities, and other entities that get their drinking water from the Cape Fear River to study water treatment technology to remove GenX from the public water supply and for ongoing monitoring of raw water supplies taken from the Cape Fear River. The balance of $250,000 is to the University of North Carolina at Wilmington to identify and quantify GenX and measure the concentration of the chemicals in the sediments of the Cape Fear Rivier. In speaking in support of this Bill, I stated that this legislation was doing exactly what the Environmental Review Commission wanted to be done by immediately addressing the situation with the Cape Fear River on a local level while the Commission further investigates how the the GenX got into the River and the Governor’s request for additional funding for DEQ and DHHS.

House Select Committee on North Carolina River Quality

During the discussions that took place during the initial meeting of the Environmental Review Commission, as well as the debate concerning House Bill 56, it was stated that the pollution situation in the Cape Fear River is a complex issue and will take time to fully investigate and remedy. It is also apparent that pollution of our sources of drinking water will not be limited to the Cape Fear River but will very likely be present in other rivers throughout the State. Since it is not clear as to when the Commission will continue to meet or how long it will take the Commission to act, Speaker of the House Tim Moore appointed a Select Committee on North Carolina River Quality and I am very honored to have been appointed as the Senior Chairman of that Committee. One reason for appointing a House Select Committee is the difficulty of a Joint Legislative Committee comprised of both House and Senate members who live throughout the State to get an agreeable date when everyone is available to meet. Another reason is that the House may want to take a different approach to resolving this issue than the Senate. Therefore, the House will have a select committee comprised of just Representatives that can move forward as they so desire. As Speaker Moore stated, “This Select Committee can move quickly to analyze the administration’s response, consider legislative recommendations and provide full transparency and accountability to citizens facing this crisis.” I intend to confer with the House Co-Chairs of the Commission to make sure that the Select Committee and the Commission do not duplicate their respective responsibilities and efforts. I also intend for any findings or recommendations by the Select Committee to be reported to the Commission for their review and consideration. I look forward to working with my fellow representatives to address the very important issue of the quality of our drinking water throughout the entire State of North Carolina. In the near future I will be scheduling the initial meeting of the Select Committee.


Saturday, July 29, 2017 7:18 PM

2017 Long Session Newsletter

During the 2017 Long Session of the General Assembly, the Legislature completed the Budget for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 biennium, the governor vetoed it, and that veto was overridden by the Legislature. The Long Session subsequently recessed during the early morning hours of Friday, June 30.

Also during the Long Session, I was a Primary Sponsor on the following bills that passed both the House and the Senate and are now law:

HB189—Search & Rescue Name/Funds, was included in the Budget. This changed the name of the Urban State Search and Rescue Program, which was confusing to the Rural areas, to the State Search and Rescue Program. An appropriation for this Program will be addressed in the Budget.

HB228—Postpone Assume Name Revisions. This Bill requires the Secretary of State to work with local Registrar of Deeds offices in order to develop, implement and maintain a state-wide data base for anyone doing business under an assumed name by December 1, 2017.

HB229—General Statutes Commission Technical Corrections Bill. This Bill contains numerous technical corrections to various General Statutes as recommended by the General Statutes Commission, of which I am a member.

HB227—Preserve Tenancy by the Entirety, was included in HB229. This amends the statute governing statutory construction to define “Husband and Wife”, “Widow”, and “Widower” to make the language gender neutral.

HB243—Strengthen Opioid Misuse Prevention Act. This Bill is the first step of the Legislature implementing the appropriate law necessary to address the present crisis of opioid use and addiction in our State.

HB324—Pilot Project to Treat Opiate Overdose, was included in the Budget. This Bill provides the necessary funding for the City of Wilmington to develop and implement a pilot project to establish a Quick Response Team to address the needs of opiate and heroin overdose victims who are not getting follow-up treatment.

HB460—Economic & Job Growth for NC Distilleries, was included in companion SB155. This Bill allows a County or a City to adopt an ordinance allowing for the sale of malt beverages, wine, and mixed beverages beginning at 10:00 AM on Sunday persuant to the licensed premises’ permit.

HB467—Agriculture and Forest Nuisance Remedies. This Bill limits the damage on private nuisance actions against agricultural and forestry operations. It is important to note that the Bill does not limit any damages for negligence, trespass, personal injury or strict liability. The Bill also does not limit any request for injunctive relief or punitive damages.

Furthermore, I was a Primary Sponsor on 8 different bills that passed the House and are pending in the Senate. Hopefully, those bills will be heard in the Senate during the 2018 Short Session.

In addition, I was a Primary Sponsor on other bills that are pending in the House that hopefully will be heard during the 2018 Short Session. I will give a report on the progress of my pending bills after the 2018 Short Session.

Separate and apart from the above, I was very proud to be a part of the following Budget appropriations involving District 19:

Pilot Project to Treat Opiate Overdose

On behalf of the City of Wilmington, I introduced HB324 and persistently lobbied for the necessary funding for the City to develop and impliment a pilot project to establish a Quick Response Team to address victims of opiate and heroin overdose. The Budget included $250,000 during the 2017-18 fiscal year and $250,000 during the 2018-2019 fiscal years for this purpose.

Fort Fisher


On behalf of Fort Fisher, I asked and persistently lobbied for the Budget to include an appropriation of $5,000,000 for the construction of a new Visitor Center, parking lot and Maintenance Facility. With the support and assistance of Speaker Tim Moore and others, this amount was included in the Budget.

Film

The proposed Budget from the Senate included $15,000,000 in recurring funds for the Film and Entertainment Grant fund beginning in the 2018-2019 fiscal year. I explained to Speaker Moore that in order for film to resume as a viable business in North Carolina, the State had to (1) have a Grant Fund that offered a sufficient amount far in excess of $15,000,000 per year and (2) that this amount be allocated in the Budget on a recurring basis. I also persistently lobbied the Speaker to at least maintain the present $30,000,000 appropriation, and in addition, an increased amount to show that this State valued and wanted the film business here. At the end of the Budget negotiations, the decision on the amount of funding came down to Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger and the Speaker. Speaker Moore successfully negotiated for $31,000,000 recurring funds to be included in the Budget beginning in the 2018-2019 fiscal year.
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In conclusion, I appreciate the opportunity given to me by my true constituents in District 19 to represent them in the General Assembly.


Wednesday, May 24, 2017 10:35 AM

Appointment to Regulatory Reform Committee

I have recently been appointed by House Speaker Tim Moore to the House Regulatory Reform Committee. This committee has a broad scope for all things that could be defined as “reforming unnecessary, duplicative or burdensome regulations.” It often touches on matters relating to state and local government, real estate development, environmental issues, business regulations, and occupational oversight in rule making. Each of these relates to other “subject areas” in many ways, but can all be branded broadly as regulatory reform.

This committee also handles standalone bills as referred to the committee but also the larger regulatory reform package that is usually passed annually.

This appointment comes in addition to my Standing Committee Assignments which are Judiciary 1 (Chair); Appropriations (Vice Chair); Appropriations—Justice and Public Safety (Chair); Rules, Calendar & Operations of the House (Vice-Chair; Commerce & Job Development; Elections & Ethics Law; and Education-Universities.

I consider it an honor and privilege to be chosen to serve on this very important committee.


Tuesday, May 23, 2017 12:28 PM

Danny McComas Receives Prestigious Award

May 22, 2017

Since 1963, North Carolina’s Governors have reserved their highest honor, The Order of the Long Leaf Pine award, for persons who have made significant contributions to the State and their communities through their exemplary service and exceptional accomplishments.

My predecessor, Danny McComas, did an outstanding job representing House District 19 in the North Carolina General Assembly. He then served at the North Carolina State Ports, and he is presently serving with the North Carolina Department of Transportation.

If was my honor and privilege to recommend Danny for the Order of the Long Leaf Pine, and with the help of others, Governor Roy Cooper granted the request and approved Danny receiving the award.

On May 20, I had the pleasure of presenting the award to Danny at a private event at my home with his family and some of his closest friends.


Friday, May 5, 2017 2:58 PM

March and April of 2017

Shortly after the 2017 Session began, I was asked to be on the House Leadership Team. The Team meets on a regular basis to discuss various bills and legislative matters that are pending in the House. I am really enjoying this new responsibility because it allows me to have input as to how our legislative business will be conducted.

In addition to my regular Committee, Session and other legislative duties,

On March 3, 2017, I attended a meeting of the General Statutes Commission in Raleigh at which time we addressed various proposed legislation that the Commission might want to prepare draft bills for introduction in the General Assembly.

On March 10, I attended the annual Wilmington Regional Association of Realtors (WRAR) Legislative Lunch, where I had the opportunity with other Legislators to answer questions from the members attending about various bills which might be addressed during the 2017 Session that are important to the real estate business.

On March 10, I also visited Murray Middle School where I had the opportunity to interact with the students and then talk with the administration and teaching staff about various educational issues.

On March 10, I concluded with attending Best Foot Forward, which is an absolutely incredible display of talent from our County elementary, middle and high schools.

On March 17, I attended the Beach Towns of New Hanover County Meeting in Kure Beach. This is an excellent opportunity for Wrightsville Beach, Carolina Beach and Kure Beach to meet with County, State and Federal officials to discuss important coastal issues.

On March 27, I attended a Conference at the Wilmington City Council chambers addressing the opioid crises. I am so proud to be a Primary Sponsor of legislation that will address this very important issue, as well as the Primary Sponsor of legislation to obtain the necessary funding for a pilot opioid program in Wilmington.

April was a very busy month. As a member of the Appropriations-Justice and Public Safety Committee, we had to prepare and submit our budget recommendations to the senior House and Senate Appropriations chairs. Also, April 27 was the cross-over deadline for all House Bills that were subject to this deadline to be successfully passed in both Committee and on the House floor to go to the Senate, or that particular bill would be ineligible for any further consideration during the 2017—2018 biennium.

I will be subsequently forwarding a list of all of the bills that I am involved with that were either subject to cross-over and successfully met the deadline or that were not subject to cross-over and still eligible for consideration.

As always, it is an honor and a privilege to serve the citizens of House District 19 in the General Assembly.


Thursday, March 16, 2017 12:56 PM

January and February of 2017

During January of 2017, I was included in an “Under the Dome” article in the Raleigh News and Observer entitled “Four things to know about new faces in powerful legislative committee roles”. The article stated that “Representative Leo Daughtry, the longtime Republican legislator from Smithfield, had been chairman of the powerful Judiciary I Committee before he retired last year.  That Committee will now be chaired by Representative Ted Davis, Jr. of Wilmington, who moves up from chairing the Judiciary III Committee”.

On January 5, I attended the annual New Hanover County School Legislative lunch where I had an excellent opportunity to discuss educational issues that are important to us locally and how they might be addressed during the 2017 Long Session of the General Assembly.

On January 14, I received a Special Recognition Award from the Friends of Fort Fisher for my leadership in securing legislative support and funding to plan a new Fort Fisher Museum and Visitor Center.

On January 18, I attended the annual Pleasure Island Chamber Workshop in Carolina Beach where I had the opportunity to discuss issues that are important to Carolina Beach and Kure Beach and how they might be addressed during the Long Session.

On January 20, I visited Carolina Beach Elementary School where I talked to the students and had a conversation with the administration and teachers about various educational issues.

On January 21, I had the pleasure of being a Judge at the Carolina Beach Inlet Association Chowder Cook-off at the High Tide Lounge in Carolina Beach.  I always enjoy this event and especially getting to sample so many great tasting chowders.

On January 25, I attended the meeting of the State Bar Legislative Committee in Raleigh and discussed how various legal issues might be addressed during the Long Session.

On February 3, I met with local District Court Judges about local legal issues and how they might be addressed during the Long Session.

On February 10, I spoke to the Adult Scholars at the UNCW Executives Development Center and answered questions that the participants had about the Legislative process and current issues that were being addressed in the General Assembly.

Also on February 10, I toured the USS North Carolina battleship and discussed necessary funding to complete improvements to this very important local historic site.

On February 17, I attended the North Carolina Society of Surveyors Annual Conference in Pinehurst, where I received a Recognition Award for my work with the North Carolina/South Carolina Boundary Dispute Commission.

On February 24, I attended a meeting of the North Carolina Beach, Inlet and Waterway Association (NCBIWA) to assist in the preparation of a legislative presentation to discuss beach renourishment and inlet dredging that was going to be given in Raleigh during March.

On February 27, I attended the annual City of Wilmington Legislative Breakfast where I had the opportunity to discuss issues that are important to the City and how they might be addressed during the Long Session.

In addition to the above, I continued my legislative duties in Raleigh representing my constituents in House District 19.


Friday, February 10, 2017 4:51 PM

Appointment to The General Statutes Commission

I am happy to report that I have been selected by the Speaker of the House of Representatives to be the House Legislative member to serve on The General Statutes Commission.

The duties of the Commission include:
      Advising and cooperating with the Legislative Services Office in the work of continuous statute research and correction for which the Legislative Services Office is made responsible by G.S. 120-36.21 (2).

       Advising and cooperating with the Legislative Services Office in the preparation and issuance of supplements to the General Statutes pursuant to G.S. 120-3621 (1).

       Making a continuing study of all matters involved in the preparation of modern codes of law.

      Recommending to the General Assembly the enactment of such substantive changes in the law as the Commission may deem advisable.

     Receiving and considering proposed changes in the law recommended by the American Law Institute, by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws or by other learned bodies.

     I look forward to my new duties on the Commission and thank the Speaker for his trust in placing me in that position. 


Tuesday, January 31, 2017 7:58 PM

My First 2 Terms in the Legislature

Much has taken place since my appointment to the House of Representatives in 2012, and I would like to take this opportunity to inform you of what has been happening with me during my 2013-2014 first Session and my 2015-2016 second Session in the General Assembly.

During the Long Session and the Short Session for each biennium, the Speaker of the House appoints members to various Standing and Non-Standing Committees.

The Standing Comittees that I was assigned to were Finance, Finance Room Occupancy Tax Subcommittee (Chair); Judiciary III (Chair); Local Government (Chair); Rules, Calendar, and Operations of the House (Vice-Chair); Elections; Commerce and Job Development; Education-Universities; and Wildlife.

The Non-Standing Committees that I have been serving on are the Joint Legislative Economic Development and Global Engagement Oversight Committee (EDGE); Joint Legislative Program Evaluation Oversight Committee (PED); PED Joint Legislative Sub-committee on Real Property; PED Joint Legislative Subcommittee on Economic Development (Chair); Legislative Research Commission (LRC); LRC Committee on Municipal Service Districts (Chair); and Joint Legislative Committee on Local Government (Chair).

During the interim period between the Long Session and Short Session of each biennium, the Speakerof the House appoints members to various interim Committees.  During the 2013-2014 interim, I served on the House Legislative Study Committee on Judicial Efficiency and Effective Administration of Justice (Chair).  During the 2015-2016 interim, I served on the Joint Legislative Oversight Committee on Local Government (Chair); House Select Committee on Step Therapy; and House Select Committee on Wildlife Resources.  During the 2016-2017 interim, I was chosen to participate in the University of North Carolina System Board of Governors Strategic Plan by serving on the Committee on Education Planning, Policies and Programs to address Student Success; the Joint Legislative Economic Development and Global Engagement Oversight Committee Strategy Workgroup for economic development in distressed counties; and the Wildlife Resources Oversight Committee fisheries stakeholder discussions.

The Speaker appointed me to the Southern Legislative Conference of The Council of State Governments, where I am a member of the Fiscal Affairs & Government Operations Committee.  The Speaker also appointed me to the 2015 Joint Select Committee on Congressional Redistricting.

Governor Pat McCrory appinted me to the North Carolina-South Carolina Joint Boundary Commission, which addressed the new boundary line between the States and the consequences that effected those previously living in the other State.

At the beginning of each biennium, the Speaker and the Chairman of the Rules, Calendar, and Operations of the House Committee assign each member to one of the 120 seats located in the House Chamber.  I sat in seat number 66 during my first term and advanced to seat number 38 for my second term.

I am very proud to have been responsible for getting the following funding approved for New Hanover County: full funding for the Cape Fear Community College (CFCC) Marine Technology Program; $30,000,000 for the film grant in 2015 and $30,000,000 in 2016; $1,000,000 to assist with the planning and design phase for a Career-Technical Education (CTE) High School to be located on the north campus of CFCC; and $400,000 for preconstruction planning and architectural drawings for a new visitor Center, parking lot and Maintenance Facility at the historic Fort Fisher site.

Since beginning in the House, I am very honored to have received the following Legislative Awards and Recognitions: the 2013 Certificate of Recognition from the Lower Cape Fear Republican Women; 2013 Defender of Liberty Award from the American Conservative Union; 2013 Champion For The Family recognition from the NC Values Coalition; 2014 Certificate of Recognition from the Partners Against Trafficking Humans in NC; 2014 Honorary Wilmington Police Department Officer Badge #19 Award; 2014 Appreciation Award from the Local Land Trust; 2014 North Carolina Land Trust “Legislator of the Year” Award; 2014 NC Metropolitan Mayors Coalition Legislative Award; 2015 Recognition gift from the Friends of Fort Fisher; 2015 Appreciation Award from the City of Wilmington; 2015 North Carolina Travel & Tourism “Tourism Champion” Legislative Award; 2015 Conservative Achievement Award from the American Conservative Union; 2015 Jobs Champion recognition by the NC Chamber; 2016 Certificate of Recognition from the New Hanover County Board of Education; 2016 Patient Champion Award from the North Carolina Orthopedic Association; 2016 Jobs Champion recognition by the NC Chamber; and 2016 Certificate of Appreciation from House Speaker Tim Moore.


          My 3rd Term in the Legislature

During a Special Session on January 11, 2017, I was sworn-in as a member of the House of Representatives for the 2017-2018 Legislative biennium.  I am extremely proud that my daughter, Amy, sang “God Bless America” during the ceremony.





I was also honored that both my wife, Jane, and Amy held my Bible while I was sworn-in.



As the 2017 Long Session begins on January 25, 2017, I will now be sitting in seat number 27 in the House Chamber.  My office will now be located in Room 417B of the Legislative Office Building (LOB) which is next to my previous office in room 418B.

My Standing Committee assignments will now be Judiciary 1 (Chair); Appropriations (Vice Chair); Appropriations--Justice and Public Safety (Chair); Rules, Calendar & Operations of the House (Vice Chair); Commerce & Job Development; Elections & Ethics Law; and Education-Universities.

My Non-Standing Committees will continue to be the Joint Legislative Economic Development and Global Engagement Oversight Committee (EDGE); Joint Legislative Program Evaluation Oversight Committee (PED); Legislative Research Commission (LRC); and Joint Legislative Committee on Local Government (Chair).

In conclusion, I am grateful to have the continued opportunity to represent my constituents in District 19, and I look forward to working on your behalf, as well as the rest of New Hanover County, during the 2017 Long Session.


Thursday, December 29, 2016 4:06 PM

December 29, 2016 Newslettter

On November 4, I attended and helped to cut the ribbon at the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission opening ceremony for the Holly Shelter Shooting Range in Pender County.  This is a safe and supervised site that includes a rifle range, pistol range and archery range.


On November 7, I attended the UNC Board of Governors Strategic Planning Forum at UNCW.  This was an excellent opportunity for the public to learn about the Strategic Planning process and for the Board to receive public input from those that attended.

On November 10, representatives from the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority and I met with legislative staff in Raleigh to discuss issues important to the Authority.

On November 14, I attended the Program Evaluation Division (PED) Committee meeting in Raleigh, where the topic was that the Medicaid Program Section is Not Cost-Effictively Identifying and Preventing Fraud, Waste, and Abuse.

On November 15, I attended another PED Committee meeting in Raleigh, where the topic was the Allotment-Specific And System-Level Issues Adversely Affect North Carolina’s Distribution Of K-12 Resources.  I also attended my third meeting of the Economic Development and Global Engagement (EDGE) Committee’s Strategy Workshop to discuss economic development in distressed counties.

On November 17, I met with representatives of the North Carolina Coastal Federation in Wrightsville Beach to discuss the Oyster Restoration and Protection Plan for North Carolina, as well as oysters and economic development in our State.

On November 18, I met with developer Jeff Kentner to discuss his proposed project for the former Galleria Mall property near Wrightsville Beach.

On November 28, I had the pleasure of speaking to Boy Scout Troop 239 at Myrtle Grove Evangelical Presbyterian Church pertaining to the members working on all three of their citizen merit badges.  It was a great opportunity for me to address such a group of fine young men, and hopefully future leaders of our community.

On December 1, I attended my fourth NC System Strategic Plan meeting of the Board of Governors in Chapel Hill, where my Committee on Student Success had further discussions concerning our goals and objectives.

On December 5, I attended a meeting with the Mayor of Wilmington, Chief District Court Judge, District Attorney, Sheriff, Police Chief, and others concerning possible legislation to be introduced during the 2017 Long Session of the General Assembly concerning opioid addiction and related mental health issues.

On December 12, I attended a PED Committee meeting in Raleigh.  At that time, we discussed various legislation that Committee members may introduce during the 2017 Long Session on behalf of the full Committee (each particular Bill is limited to 4 Primary Sponsors).

On December 13, 14, 15 and 16, I attended Special Sessions of the Legislature in Raleigh.

On December 20, I participated in the fourth meeting pursuant to a telephone conference call of the EDGE Committee Strategy Workgroup to discuss economic development in distressed counties.

On December 21 and 22, I attended a Special Session of the Legislature in Raleigh.

In conclusion, I hope that everyone had a wonderful Christmas Holiday with their family;  I wish you all a happy New Year; and I look forward to the privilege of continuing to work on your behalf in 2017.


Wednesday, November 2, 2016 8:32 AM

2015-2016 Interim, July through October

I have had the opportunity to be involved in various issues the last few months as I continue to represent House District 19 since the 2016 Legislative Session of the General Assembly adjourned. 

On July 15, I spoke at an event at Fort Fisher announcing the $400.000 appropriation from the State House of Representatives for preconstruction planning and architectural drawings for a new Visitor Center, parking lot and Maintenance Facility.

On July 27, I attended the final meeting in Raleigh of the North Carolina-South Carolina Boundary Dispute Commission as a result of the successful legislation that I helped to work on last Session.

On July 28, I attended my first UNC System Strategic Plan Meeting of the Board of Governors in Chapel Hill, where my Committee on Student Success had our initial discussions concerning our progress and our goals.

On August 11, I attended a public comment meeting in Wilmington concerning the judicial system in North Carolina.  This was of special interest to me because I am a Chair of the House Judiciary III Committee.

On August 15, I spoke at the Recreational Fishing Alliance – NC meeting in Carolina Beach about various issues pertaining to salt-water fishing and proposed legislation for the 2017 Session.

On August 16, I had the honor of presenting the Order of the Long Leaf Pine to retired Police Chief Dennis Cooper at the meeting of the Kure Beach Town Council.

On August 22, I attended the Joint Legislative Program Evaluation Oversight Committee (PED) meeting in Raleigh.

On September 1, I met with members of the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority concerning various issues and proposed legislation for the 2017 Session.

On September 6, I received a Certificate of Recognition at the meeting of the New Hanover County Board of Education for the $1,000,000 appropriation from the State House of Representatives for the planning and design phase for a Career-Technical Education (CTE) high school to be located on the north campus of Cape Fear Community College.

On September 7, I attended the first meeting in Raleigh of the Joint Legislative Economic Development and Global Engagement Oversight Committee (EDGE) Strategy Work group to discuss economic development in distressed counties.

On September 8, I attended my second UNC System Strategic Plan meeting of the Board of Governors in Chapel Hill, where my Committee on Student Success had further discussions concerning our goals and objectives.

On September 12, I attended the PED meeting in Raleigh.

On September 13, I attended the Wildlife Resources Oversight Committee fisheries stakeholder discussions in Raleigh to address various issues pertaining to salt-water fishing and proposed legislation for the 2017 Session.

On September 21, I visited BAYADA Home Health Care in Wilmington and spoke to the staff about issues to ensure that home health care services remain a viable option for people who need it.

On September 23, I attended the Beach Towns Breakfast Meeting in Wrightsville Beach where representatives from Wrightsville Beach, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and New Hanover County met to discuss various coastal issues and hear Federal and State Legislative Updates.

On September 26, I met with representatives of the Wilmington Film Commission and EUE Screen Gem Studios to discuss the status of productions in New Hanover County and the 2017 Legislative Session.

On September 28, I met with a representative from Duke Energy Corporation for an update concerning coal ash and other issues.

On September 28, I also attended a lunch meeting of the Retired Physicians Section of the New Hanover-Pender County Medical Society.  I heard an interesting program by Brock Womble, Executive Director of the North Carolina Centers for the Advancement of Teaching.

On September 29, I also attended an Eastern North Carolina Agriculture Rally in Kenansville where Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler and others spoke on the importance of agriculture in our state.  It was very informative.

On October 6, I attended an Opioids Legislative Summit by the City of Wilmington where State and local community leaders discussed this very serious problem and ways to successfully confront it.  There will be follow-up meetings and I look forward to participating in those additional discussions.

On October 10, I met with legislative staff in Raleigh to discuss issues concerning the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority, as well as meeting with various individuals concerning the Room Occupancy Tax. 

On October 10, I also attended the PED meeting in Raleigh.

On October 13 and 14, I attended my third NC System Strategic Plan meeting of the Board of Governors in Chapel Hill, where my Committee on Student Success had further discussions concerning our goals and objectives.

On October 20, I attended the General Manager’s Roundtable of the Wilmington, NC Historic River District & Island Beaches.  I listened to an update of the Wilmington Police Department Real-time Crime Center and Yammer Communication.  I also spoke on, and answered questions about the School Calendar; Film Incentives; Occupancy Taxes; and HB2.

On October 20, I also attended the second meeting in Raleigh of the EDGE Strategy Workgroup to discuss economic development in distressed counties.

On October 24, I attended the Awards Dinner at the NC League of Municipalites Annual Conference in Raleigh, where I received the Annual Community Champion Legislative Award.

On October 25, I met again with legislative staff in Raleigh to discuss issues concerning the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority.

In closing, Election Day is Tuesday, November 8.  Whether you are a Democrat, Republican, Libertarian or Independent, if you have not already done so, please exercise your right to vote in the very important election.  Many men and women serving in our armed forces defending our great nation have given the supreme sacrifice of their lives so that we can enjoy the freedoms that we have today.  We must never take that for granted.


Tuesday, November 1, 2016 9:33 AM

Davis Receives Annual Community Champion Legislative Award

Representative Ted Davis Jr. was presented the Annual Community Champion Legislative Award given by the North Carolina League of Municipalities (NCLM) at the Awards Dinner of their Annual Conference held in Raleigh on October 24, 2016.

This prestigious award is given to one member of the House of Representatives and one member of the Senate in recognition of their respective dedicated support of North Carolina cities and towns.

Representative Davis, who is a Chair of the House Local Government Committee, was recognized with sincere appreciation for his efforts to not only listen to the perspectives of municipal officials, but to also work tirelessly on their behalf during debates, this last legislative session.

Representative Ted Davis, Jr. accepts his Community Champion Award from Elkin Mayor Lestine Hutchens, the League’s outgoing president.


Wednesday, October 12, 2016 8:10 PM

Jobs Champion Recognition

Representative Ted Davis Jr. has been recognized as a 2015 and 2016 Jobs Champion by the North Carolina Chamber because his votes during each of the 2015 Long Session and 2016 Short Session of the last legislative biennium demonstrate a commitment to preserving and enhancing a positive climate for business and job creation in North Carolina.

As a pro-jobs legislator, Representative Davis understands the policies that enhance North Carolina’s business climate, improve our education and talent supply system, develop our intrastructure, and boost entrepreneurship and innovation.  As a result of the pro-growth policies that he has helped to advance over the past few years, businesses of all sizes that employ millions of North Carolinians can look to expand, spurring further business investments and job creation. 




Saturday, September 24, 2016 4:14 PM

2016-2017 Interim

During the 2016-17 Interim, I have been  chosen to participate with the Joint Legislative Economic Development and Global Engagement Oversight (EDGE) Committee Strategy Workgroup to address economic development in distressed counties.  The Workgroup is being led by Brent Lane, Director for the UNC Center for Competitive Economies.  At the first meeting in Raleigh on September 7, we had our initial discussions identifying long term economic goals and legislative actions for  improved economics in those areas.  The next meeting is scheduled for October 20, 2016.

I have also been chosen to participate with the Wildlife Resources Oversight Committee fisheries stakeholder discussions to address various issues pertaining to salt-water fishing.  The discussions are being led by Representative Jimmy Dixon.  At the first meeting in Raleigh on September 13, stakeholder presentations were being made by the Coastal Conservation Association, Recreational Fishing Alliance – NC, NC Fishery Association, Wildlife Resources Commission, Division of Marine Fisheries, and Marine Fisheries Commission.  Representative Dixon and  I will recommend to Representative John Bell, Chairman of the Wildlife  Resources  Oversight Committee, that a meeting be held to discuss the definition of “commercial fisherman”, as well as address who issues a commercial fishing license; the cost of licenses; what a commercial fisherman can do with a license; the transfer of licenses; the assignment of licenses; and the reciprocity of licenses.  However, the most important issue to be included in our conversations is the resource, which is the fish.

 


Wednesday, September 14, 2016 9:46 PM

Newsletter—September 12, 2016

Certificate of Recognition

During the 2016 Legislative Session, I was able to successfully lobby for a $1 million grant from the House of Representatives to the New Hanover County Board of Education to help with the planning and design phase for a Career-Technical Education (CTE) high school to be located on the north campus of Cape Fear Community College.

This new school will help students earn industry certification and credentials in addition to their high school diplomas.  The school plans to have 9 different program areas and 78 different career pathways that students will be able to choose from.  By graduation, each student will have a diploma, certificate or degree in his/her chosen field, industry credentials and financial literacy.

At the September 6th meeting of the New Hanover County Board of Education, I  received a Certificate of Recognition for my assistance with this project. Below is a picture of the presentation of the Certificate. I am very privileged to be a part of such a wonderful endeavor and I look forward to continuing to work with the Board toward the completion of what will be an educational jewel.

 

Patient Champion Award

I have received a 2016 Patient Champion Award by the North Carolina Orthopaedic Association for my support of lower healthcare costs through Certificate of Need reform legislation, as well as being a champion of patient choice and outpatient surgery and imaging services. 

Below is a picture of the presentation of the award. 

Certificate of Appreciation

I have been awarded a Certificate of Appreciation by House Speaker Tim Moore in recognition of my “excellent leadership and commitment to chairing the Judiciary III Committee, the Local Government Committee, the Joint Legislative Committee on Local Government, and the Committee on Municipal Service Districts” during the 2015-2016 Legislative Sessions.  “Your dedication and contributions to the citizens of our great State are commendable.”  I am very appreciative of the opportunities that Speaker Moore has given me and the confidence that he has shown in me.  I am honored to receive this recognition and look forward to continuing to work on behalf of those who live in District 19.


Thursday, August 25, 2016 9:30 AM

Order of the Long Leaf Pine Award

At the request of Kure Beach Mayor Emilie Swearingen, I had the pleasure of recommending retired Kure Beach Police Chief Dennis Cooper to Governor Pat McCrory to receive the Order of the Long Leaf Pine award.

Dennis has served with the Kure Beach Police Department for 24 years, which included more than 20 of those years as the Chief of Police.

Besides his public service as a law enforcement officer, Dennis has been a fireman, EMT, Patrol Officer, expert marksman, law enforcement instructor, top-ranked K-9 handler, FBI National Academy graduate, Certified Forensic Computer Examiner and cellphone forensic examiner.  He has also assisted, consulted and collaborated with the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol, ATF, DEA, FBI and the U.S. Secret Service.

Dennis has always been in tune with the needs of the citizens and his co-workers; anticipated problems and searched for solutions proactively; and motivated his co-workers and created opportunities for them to succeed.

Dennis is truly an outstanding public servant and I cannot think of a more deserving person to receive such a prestigious award, among the highest conferred by the Governor for exemplary service above and beyond the call of duty. 

The Governor granted the recommendation and below is a picture of me presenting the award to Dennis, with his wife and daughter watching, at the August 16. 2016 meeting of the Kure Beach Council.

 


Wednesday, August 17, 2016 8:18 AM

TED DAVIS CHOSEN TO PARTICIPATE IN THE UNC SYSTEM STRATEGIC PLAN

The Board of Governors (BOG) for the University of North Carolina System is presently working on a UNC Strategic Plan.  The 5 focal points of the Strategic Plan are Affordability and Efficiency, Student Access, Student Success, Economic Impact, and Excellent and Diverse Institutions.

I have been asked to represent the North Carolina House of Representatives on the Committee on Education Planning, Policies and Programs to address Student Success, which is about how best to get students out quickly, successfully and prepared to find a job.

While the BOG wants to increase six year graduation rates, the BOG also want to move away from that Federal standard as a desirable measurement.  The BOG takes the position that students need to get out in something like the minimum hours for their major plus a percentage of somewhere between 5% and 10% over minimum, which in most cases would be around 130 semester hours.

Since cutting the time to graduation will impact affordability, the BOG will need to look at student counseling, particularly at making an early choice for a pathway to a major, cutting down on double majors, which the data shows does little to enhance employability or income, and having effective early warning systems of academic problems for the student and effective intervention.

In addition, the BOG will need to look at the curriculums at the various schools in the System to determine if there are courses being taught that are really not relevant to a particular major.  If so, is that school just letting the faculty teach what they want?  And just how far should the BOG intervene as to what is taught?

These are all very interesting issues, and having obtained my undergraduate degree from UNC-Chapel Hill and being a member of the House Education-Universities Committee, I am very honored and excited to have this unique opportunity to participate with the BOG and the Committee that will be addressing student success.


Friday, July 29, 2016 9:41 AM

Report on the 2016 Legislative Session – July 28, 2016

My personal highlight came on June 16 when I again was allowed the honor and opportunity to serve as the speaker of the House during the Session that day.



During the Session, I was involved in the following legislation:

HB38—Judicial Efficiency/Effective Administration of Justice
(Davis, Lead Primary Sponsor)
I introduced this Bill, which had separate sections, during the 2015 Session.  It passed the House and was referred to the Senate.  No further action was taken during that Session.  I continued to work with the Mediation Network of North Carolina, the District Attorney Association and the Administrative Office of the Courts to come up with agreeable language to the Sections that dealt with criminal mediation in District Court.  During the 2016 Session, I included this language in a Proposed Committee Substitute (PCS) to Senate Bill 508.  The Senate concurred with the PCS for this Bill and it was sent to the Governor for his signature.

HB171—Modify Film Grant Fund
(Davis, Lead Primary Sponsor)
During the 2015 Session, I filed this bill and was able to successfully lobby through the budget process $30 million for the Film Grant in the budget for the 2015-2017 fiscal years. The funds were used in the 2015-2016 fiscal year.  When the Budget negotiations were taking place between the House and Senate during the 2016 Session, I made sure that the $30 million appropriation for the 2016-2017 fiscal years remained intact.

HB436—Unauthorized Practice of Law Changes
(Davis, A Primary Sponsor)
This Bill was introduced during the 2015 Session, passed the House, passed the Senate with additional language, was returned to the House, and no further action was taken.  During the 2016 Session, the House and the Senate came to an agreement, the Bill passed both Chambers, and it was signed by the Governor.

HB834/SB575—NC/SC Original Border Confirmation
(Davis, The Primary Sponsor)
During the 2015 Session, I introduced HB834 and companion SB575 (same language) was introduced by Tommy Tucker in the Senate.  We had both been previously appointed by the Governor to the North Carolina/South Carolina Boundary Commission.  SB575 was amended in a PCS to include additional negotiated language, passed the Senate, came to the House, and I did not proceed any further on HB834.  I presented SB575 to the House Committees and on the House floor.  The Bill passed the House, passed the Senate, and was signed by the Governor.

HB976—Enhance Oversight of Service Contracts/PED
(Davis, A Primary Sponsor)
During the interim between the 2015 and 2016 Session, I attended Program Evaluation Division (PED) Committee meetings where we heard presentations about and discussed State Service contract.  As a result of that PED study, HB976 was introduced during the 2016 Session.  The Bill passed the House, was sent to the Senate, and no further action was taken.  Hopefully, this legislation can be addressed again during the 2017 Session.

HB1023—Municipal Service Districts/Statutory Changes
(Davis, The Primary Sponsor)
During the interim between the 2015 and 2016 Session, I attended Legislative Research Commission (LRC) meetings and chaired a Committee on Municipal Service Districts where we heard presentations about and discussed how the present legislation concerning these Districts might be improved.  As a result of that LRC study, I introduced HB1023 during the 2016 Session.  This bill passed the House, passed the Senate, and was signed by the Governor.

HB1043—Zip Line and Challenge Course Safety/Sander’s Law
(Davis, Lead Primary Sponsor)
During the 2015 Session, I introduced HB39 (that passed both Chambers and was signed by the Governor) which directed the Department of Labor (DOL) to study the regulation of the operation of zip lines.  This was done during the interim between the 2015 and 2016 Sessions.  When the report was completed, I met with the DOL and the decision was made that I would pursue stand-alone legislation for the regulation of zip lines by the DOL rather than pursuant to existing Amusement Device legislation.
With the assistance of the DOL, I introduced HB1043.  The Bill was heard in the House Judiciary 3 Committee and received a favorable report.  Since the 2016 Session was coming to an end, I did not proceed any further.  I will address this Bill again in the 2017 Session.

HB1082—Eliminate Use of Development Tiers
(Davis, Lead Primary Sponsor)
During the interim between the 2015 and 2016 Session, I attended Program Evaluation Division (PED) Committee meetings and Joint Legislative Economic Development and Global Engagement Oversight (EDGE) Committee meetings, wherein we discussed what legislation could be introduced that would adequately address how the State presently addresses economically distressed areas.  I chaired a PED Subcommittee that studied this issue in detail and recommended proposed legislation to the full PED Committee, which was approved.  During the same time, I was discussing this issue in the EDGE Committee and informing that Committee of what PED was doing. The EDGE Committee approved proposed legislation that took a different approach than the PED recommendation.  During the 2016 Session, I introduced HB1082 containing the language that had been previously approved by the PED Committee.  HB1029—Economic Development Changes & Study was also introduced containing the language that had been previously approved by the EDGE Committee.  Both of these Bills were referred to the Rules Committee so that all of the involved parties could meet in order to develop legislation that would contain language that was agreeable to everyone.  This was not accomplished because time ran out this Session.  Both Bills will be addressed again in the 2017 Session.

HB1083—Wilmington/Ordinance Initiative & Referendum
(Davis, Lead Primary Sponsor)
At the request of the City of Wilmington, I introduced local HB1083 to clarify the submission of a Petition for proposed Ordinances to the City Council.  This Bill, which did not require the signature of the Governor, passed both the House and the Senate and was enacted.

Occupancy Tax Sub-Committee
As Chairman of the Sub-Committee of the Finance Committee, I worked with various legislators to being their respective Bills into compliance with the House Occupancy Tax Guidelines so they could successfully move forward.  Being in compliance is extremely important in preserving the integrity of the Guidelines.

House Conferee for the following:
1.       HB436—Unauthorized Practice of Law Changes
2.      HB1039—Omnibus Occupancy Tax Changes

2016-2017 State Budget Appropriations

With the assistance of Speaker Tim Moore, I was able to successfully lobby for a $1 million grant from the House of Representatives to the New Hanover County Board of Education to help with the planning and design phase for a Career-Technical Education (CTE) high school to be located on the north campus of Cape Fear Community College.

With the help of the various House Appropriations Chairs, Speaker Tim Moore and members of his staff, I was able to successfully lobby for $400,000 for advanced planning for a new Fort Fisher Visitor Center/Museum, which is an immediate outgrowth of the Friends of Fort Fisher Master Plan Initiative and sets them on a pathway to seeing a new 20,000 square foot facility in the foreseeable future.


In conclusion, as the 2015-2016 biennium Legislative Sessions are over, I would like to thank the voters of House District 19 for giving me the honor and privilege of representing you in Raleigh.  I know that I cannot make everyone happy, but I do try very hard to listen to those that I represent and do what I truly believe is in the best interest of everyone who lives in our District. 


Wednesday, July 27, 2016 5:44 PM

Fort Fisher Funding

On July 15, 2016, North Carolina Department of Natural & Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Klutz and I attended an announcement by Executive Director Paul Laird and Friends of Fort Fisher Chairman John Coble at the Fort Fisher State Historic Site in Kure Beach about funding for a proposed expansion.

The Friends of Fort Fisher had previously raised and spent a total of $50,000.00 of private funds for a feasibility study and a master plan, which included a new Visitor Center, parking lot and Maintenance Facility.  The next step was to obtain the necessary funding in the amount of $400,000 for preconstruction planning and architectural drawings.

When I met with Paul Laird and the Friends of Fort fisher to learn about the project, I immediately informed them that I would try to do my best to obtain the necessary funding during the budget negotiations that would take place during the 2016 Short Session of the General Assembly.

I am very proud that with the help of the various House Appropriation Chairs, Speaker Tim Moore and members of his staff, I was able to successfully lobby for this funding.  Once the architectural plans have been completed, the Friends will be in a far better position to seek additional funding from the private sector to proceed with the construction of these projects.

I cannot tell you how much I appreciate each of the individuals who supported this endeavor, and how proud I am that the House of Representatives recognizes the significance of this important local historic site.


Monday, July 11, 2016 9:00 PM

Constituent Letter--Vocational Education Funding

The following was a press release from the New Hanover County Board of Education:

New Hanover County Schools Receive State Funding for Regional CTE High School.

New Hanover County Schools is pleased to announce that it has received a $1 million grant from the State House of Representatives in the 2016-17 State Budget to help with establishing a Career-Technical Education (CTE) high school.  The funds have been allocated to assist with the planning and design phase of the school.  The district would especially like to thank Representative Ted Davis, Jr. for advocating for the funding throughout the budgeting process.

“New Hanover County Schools is very grateful for the State funding and the support that it will provide for our regional CTE high school” said NHCS Superintendent Dr. Tim Markley.  “Representative Davis and Speaker of the House Tim Moore understand our desire to plan and build a vocational high school that will be unique to our region, as well as eastern North Carolina.”

The future CTE high school will be a joint venture that will include Cape Fear Community College and Pender County Schools, thus offering vocational classes and programs to both New Hanover and Pender County high school students.  The New Hanover County Board of Education and Board of Commissioners have discussed the value of a CTE high school for many years.  Throughout the last year, representatives from all involved parties have been meeting to begin planning the high school.  The State funding will help to advance the project into the next phase. 

Lisa Estep, Board Member and Co-Chair of the CTE High School Work Group, said, “I am thrilled that we have received this funding and look forward to bringing the committee back to discuss our next steps.  This is a strong indicator of the community support around a CTE high school.”

The development of the CTE high school is a result of the economic demands of the Cape Fear region for workforce ready and skilled employees.  Graduates of the high school will receive both a high school diploma and industry credentials that will enable them to be readily-employed or advance their degree at a two or four-year college.  The students will have the opportunity to take community college classes in their chosen career field while they attend high school courses that will be tailored to their career path.

“Cape Fear Community College is excited about the opportunity and looks forward to the partnership,”
Said CFCC President Dr. Amanda Lee.

New Hanover county board of Education Chairman Donald Hayes appreciates the efforts of those who have helped to bring the project to life.  “The development of the CTE high school will provide students an alternative to college and the opportunity to complete high school with skills needed to be successful in today’s workforce,” stated Chairman Hayes.

The CTE high school will include programs such as hospitality and food service, construction management and public safety.


Sunday, May 15, 2016 11:28 AM

May 9 2016 Constituent Newsletter


The American Conservative Union has released its ratings for the North Carolina General Assembly based upon votes cast on a range of Bills during the 2015 Long Session that determines a member’s adherence to conservative principles.  These Bills focused on fiscal and economic issues, social and cultural issues, and government integrity issues.

Based upon my voting record, I have been presented an Award for Conservative Achievement.


Friday, May 6, 2016 9:00 AM

April 30th Newsletter

April was a busy month as I prepared to return for the 2016 Short Session.

On April 4, I made preparations with Co-Chair Senator Trudy Wade and staff for the meeting of the Committee on Municipal Service Districts on April 6.

On April 6, I chaired the Committee on Municipal Service Districts meeting in Raleigh.  At that time, the Committee approved a proposed Bill that would make some additions to the present legislation concerning Municipal Service Districts.

On April 7, I attended the Economic Development and Global Engagement (EDGE) Oversight Committee meeting in Raleigh.  At that time, the Committee approved a proposed Bill that would make changes to how the State presently addresses economically distressed areas.

On April 9, I had the pleasure of riding in the Azalea Festival Parade with my 3-year old grandson, Tee.  As you can see in the picture below, he got the hang of waving to the crowd.




On April 11, I attended the Joint Legislative Program Evaluation (PED) Oversight Committee meeting in Raleigh.  At that time, the Committee approved a proposed Bill that takes a different approach than the EDGE Bill referred to above, that would make changes to how the State presently addresses economically distressed areas.

On April 12, I met with Department of Labor Staff to discuss the proposed legislation to regulate zip lines in North Carolina that I intend to proceed with in the General Assembly.

On April 14, I met with County Commissioner Rob Zapple to discuss issues important to both New Hanover County and the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority.

Also on April 14, I was joined by other members of our local legislative delegation for a breakfast meeting with the Wilmington City Council.  We discussed the City’s legislative Agenda for the 2016 Short Session.

During April 12, 13, 14 and 15, I communicated with the Speaker’s staff and the pertinent Appropriation Committee Chairs about funding for a vocational education high school that would be located on the Cape Fear Community College north campus, as well as funding for improvements to the Fort Fisher Historic Site pursuant to their Master Plan.

On April 18, I toured the Wilmington Family YMCA and had a very informative discussion with YMCA staff and supporters about possible State funding for certain programs that are administered by the YMCA and are very beneficial to the youth in our area.

Also on April 18, I attended the Razor Walker Awards presented by the UNCW Watson College of Education to individuals for their vision, tenacity, courage and sacrifice in services to the children and youth of our State. 

On April 19, I attended and spoke at a meeting of the Recreational Fishermen Association of North Carolina (RFA-NC) concerning issues and concerns involving recreational saltwater fishermen and members of the fishing industry.

On April 25, I attended the Legislative Research Commission meeting in Raleigh and then participated in the opening day meeting of the House for the 2016 Short Session.

Now that the Legislature is in Session, I will keep you posted on what I am doing on behalf of District 19 and the remainder of our great State.



Thursday, April 7, 2016 6:12 PM

March Constituent Newsletter

I continue to be busy during the month of March working on behalf of House District 19.

On March 1, I met with former City Council member Laura Padgett about a possible railroad project outside and within the City of Wilmington.

On March 2, I met with Wilmington Mayor Bill Saffo and the City Attorney to discuss some local issues that they wanted me to assist with in the General Assembly.

On March 7, I chaired the Joint Legislative Program Evaluation Oversight (PED) Committee’s Subcommittee on Economic Development meeting in Raleigh.  We discussed proposed legislation to address the replacement of the present Economic Development Tiers System for distressed counties.

On March 10, I met with individuals to discuss the possibility of the State’s involvement with the Mattuskeet National Wildlife Refuge in Hyde County, North Carolina.

Also on March 10, I attended the annual New Hanover County Board of Education Legislative Luncheon.  In attendance were members of the County Commissioners and School Board, as well as Administration, Principals and Teachers.  It was an excellent opportunity to discuss local educational priorities and how those issues might be addressed by the General Assembly

On March 14, I attended the PED Committee meeting in Raleigh.  We discussed the Subcommittee on Economic Development’s proposed legislation to address the replacement of the present Economic Development Tiers System for distressed counties.

On March 16, I attended the Select Committee on Wildlife Resources meeting in Raleigh.  We discussed various issues and possible legislation by the General Assembly. 

On March 17, I attended the Joint Legislative Economic Development and Global Engagement Oversight committee meeting in Raleigh.  We discussed PED’s proposed legislation to address the replacement of the present Economic Development Tiers System for distressed counties. 

On March 21, I attended a Newspaper Roundtable discussion at the Wilmington Chamber of Commerce concerning various issues pertaining to the newspaper business and possible legislation by the General Assembly.

On March 22, I attended a North Carolina Bar Association Forum in Cary concerning legislation affecting the unauthorized practice of law and internal providers.

On March 23, I attended the Special Session of the General Assembly to address the Ordinance that had been enacted by the City of Charlotte.

Also on March 23, I attended the House Select Committee on Step Therapy meeting in Raleigh.  There were very informative presentations and discussion about the very serious problem of prescription drug abuse in our State.

On March 24, I attended a luncheon honoring North Carolina Veterans at the local American Legion Post 10.  It was an honor to be a part of such a wonderful tribute to the men and women who have served in our military.

On March 29, I attended a meeting in Kure Beach to discuss the Fort Fisher State Historic Site Master Plan, which would include a new Visitor Center, a new Maintenance Facility, and a new/renovated Parking Lot.  I have previously worked on behalf of Fort Fisher since being in the Legislature, and I will be working on obtaining the necessary funding to move forward on the Master Plan.  This site is very important to our local history and is an extremely popular tourist attraction.

On March 30, I attended a “Beaches 101” presentation at Carolina Beach sponsored by the Wilmington Regional Association of Realtors (WRAR).  Dr. Nicole Elko gave an excellent talk on how beach and inlets work; erosion management; and beach renourishment.  With the ongoing elimination of Federal funding, it is critical that Wrightsville Beach, Carolina Beach and Kure Beach obtain steady and sufficient funding sources to address inlet dredging and beach renourishment.  Our inlets and beaches are very important to tourism in this area and are an economic engine for our local economy.  I will be working on obtaining State funding for these projects. 



Saturday, March 12, 2016 2:44 PM

February 2016 Constituent Newsletter

On February 1, I met with Chief Ralph Evangelis at the Wilmington Police Department to talk about gangs and the use of heroin in Wilmington, as well as tougher criminal legislation.

On February 3, I was in Raleigh to meet with Representative Dean Arp about the proposed Connect NC Bond, Legislative Staff about Municipal Service Districts, and Representative Susan Martin and members of the Speaker’s Office about the House Occupancy Tax Guidelines and proposed Occupancy Tax Legislation.

On February 4, I attended a Joint Legislative Economic Development & Global Engagement Oversight Committee meeting in Raleigh.

On February 8, I attended a Program Evaluation Division (PED) meeting in Raleigh.

I also met with members of the Connect NC Committee to discuss the Connect NC Bond, Representative Dennis Riddle to discuss tougher penalties for those convicted of Human Trafficking and the NC Metropolitan Mayors Coalition about issues that might be addressed in the 2016 Short Session.

In addition, I attended the North Carolina Leadership Dinner and listened to a very interesting keynote address entitled “Preparing for the Workforce of the Future” by Fran O’Sullivan, IBM Senior State Executive for NC.

On February 9, I met with PED staff in Raleigh to discuss the PED Subcommittee on Economic Development meeting that I would be chairing on February 25.

I also met with Legislative staff to discuss the Legislative Research Commission on Municipal Service Districts that I would be chairing on March 2.

In addition, upon my return to Wilmington, I attended a meeting of the Carolina Beach Inlet Association in Carolina Beach.

On February 10, I met with New Hanover County School Board member Bruce Shell to talk about vocational education and my supporting that effort at the New Hanover County Commissioner meeting on February 15.

I also gave a presentation about the proposed Connect NC Bond to members of the Residents of Old Wilmington (ROW).

On February 11, I met with the City of Wilmington and Wilmington Downtown Inc. to discuss Municipal Service Districts.

I also attended the Opening Reception at UNCW Randall Library for the Exhibit celebrating Mike McIntyre’s 18 years in Congress.

On February 12, I gave a presentation to the Wilmington-Cape Fear Rotary Club about the proposed Connect NC Bond.

I also attended the New Hanover County Beach Communities Breakfast and Meeting at the Carolina Beach Town Hall.  The topics that were addressed included the Kure Beach and Carolina Beach Coastal Storm Reduction Project; permanent State funding for coastal storm damage reduction; the New Hanover County Economic Impact Study; and sales tax distribution. 

In addition, I spoke to the Adult Scholars Leadership Program about the North Carolina General Assembly and answered questions from the participants.  It was wonderful to see so many individuals taking an interest in politics on the local and State level.


Sunday, February 21, 2016 10:07 AM

February 19, 2016 Newsletter


Monday, February 15, 2016

 
As a member of the Congressional Redistricting Committee, I was asked to moderate the local Public Hearing that was conducted at Cape Fear Community College’s North Campus.  The hearing room was packed and the individuals who attended were able to watch and listen to those who spoke at all of the public hearing locations throughout the State of North Carolina.  Locally, approximately 18 of those present spoke either in favor of or against the drawing of new boundaries for the 1st and 12th Congressional Districts.  It was very interesting to hear the different comments and I appreciate those who took the time and effort to attend the various public hearings and exercise their right to speak. 



Tuesday, February 16

 
The Committee held its initial organizational meeting in Raleigh; discussed the criteria for drawing the 2016 Contingent Congressional Map; and adopted those criteria.  The meeting was then adjourned so that the criteria could be entered into the computers that would draw different map options for review and comment by the Committee.  The criteria to be used is the following:

Equal Population
The Committee will use the 2010 federal decennial census data as the sole basis of population for the establishment of districts in the 2016 Contingent Congressional Plan.  The number of persons in each congressional district shall be as nearly as equal as practicable, as determined under the most recent federal decennial census.

Contiguity
Congressional districts shall be comprised of contiguous territory.  Contiguity by water is sufficient.

Political Data
The only data other than population data to be used to construct congressional districts shall be election results in statewide contests since January 1, 2008, not including the last two presidential contests.  Data identifying the race of individuals or voters shall not be used in the construction or consideration of districts in the 2016 Contingent Congressional Plan.  Voting districts (“VTDs”) should be split only when necessary to comply with the zero deviation population requirements set forth above in order to ensure the integrity of political data.

Partisan Advantage
The partisan makeup of the congressional delegation under the enacted plan is 10 Republicans and 2 Democrats.  The Committee shall make reasonable efforts to construct districts in the 2016 Contingent Congressional Plan to maintain the current partisan makeup of North Carolina’s congressional delegation.

Twelfth District
The current General Assembly inherited the configuration of the Twelfth District from past General Assemblies.  This configuration was retained because the district had already been heavily litigated over the past two decades and ultimately approved by the courts.  The Harris court has criticized the shape of the Twelfth District citing its “serpentine” nature.  In light of this, the Committee shall construct districts in the 2016 Contingent Congressional Plan that eliminate the current configuration of the Twelfth District.

Compactness
In light of the Harris court’s criticism of the compactness of the First and Twelfth Districts, the Committee shall make reasonable efforts to construct districts in the 2016 Contingent Congressional Plan that improve the compactness of the current districts and keep more counties and VTDs whole as compared to the current enacted plan.  Division of counties shall only be made for reasons of equalizing population, consideration of incumbency and political impact.  Reasonable efforts shall be made not to divide a county into more than two districts.

Incumbency
Candidates for Congress are not required by law to reside in a district they seek to represent.  However, reasonable efforts shall be made to ensure that incumbent members of Congress are not paired with another incumbent in one of the new districts constructed in the 2016 Contingent Congressional Plan.



Wednesday, February 17

 
The Committee met to consider any proposed maps that had been prepared on behalf of either the Democrat or Republican Legislators. While the Republican legislators did present a proposed map, the Democrat legislators chose not to do so.  The Republican legislators contended that the proposed map complied with the criteria that the Committee had previously approved as follows:

Equal Population
All of the districts are drawn with either 733,499 total persons or 733,498 total persons.  This is as equal as practicable and in accordance with federal law.

Contiguity
All of the areas of every district are composed of contiguous territory.

Political Data
That stat reports show which election results were used in building these districts.  Race was not considered and is not present on these reports.

Partisan Advantage
We believe this map will produce an opportunity to elect 10 Republican members of Congress.  But make no mistake this is a weaker map than the enacted plan in that respect.


Twelfth District
This map does away with the serpentine 12th district that dates to 1992.

Compactness
Only 13 counties and 13 VTDs were split in this map.  In accordance with the criteria, more whole counties and more whole precincts are the best indicator of compactness we believe to be available.

Incumbency
Only two incumbents are double bunked in this map—one Republican and one Democrat.  Eleven incumbents were placed in a district by themselves. 

The Committee voted to approve the proposed map.  On Thursday the map would be presented to the Senate for consideration; if approved, the map would be reviewed by the Congressional Redistricting Committee; and then the map would be presented to the House for consideration. 



Thursday, February 18

The map was discussed by the Senate, minor changes were made, a vote was taken, and the amended map was approved.

A separate Bill dealing with the new date for the Congressional Primary was discussed in the Committee and approved.  The Bill was then introduced in the House, discussed, voted on, and approved. 



Friday, February 19


The Senate heard the Bill concerning the new date for the Congressional Primary and a minor change was made.  A vote was taken and the amended Bill was approved.  Then the amended Bill was discussed by the House, a vote was taken, and the Bill was approved.  The new hearing date will be June 7, 2016.

The Committee addressed the amended map from the Senate.  A Public Hearing was conducted for input and one person addressed the Committee.  The Committee then discussed, voted, and the map was approved.  Then the House met, discussed, voted, and approved the map.

Unless a stay is granted by the United State Supreme Court before the end of today,
the new map will be submitted to the Federal Court in response to the mandate that a new redistricting map be drawn by the Legislature on or before this date.


Wednesday, February 17, 2016 9:10 AM

February 16th Newsletter


I have been appointed by House Speaker Tim Moore to the Joint Select Committee onCongressional Redistricting, which is comprised of 36 members, of which 18 are from the House and 18 are from the Senate.

The Committee shall study, and obtain public comment, regarding, the recent United States District Court decision requiring the redrawing of the 1st Congressional District, which covers all of portions of 24 counties in eastern North Carolina, and the 12th Congressional District, which covers portions of Winston-Salem, Greensboro and Charlotte, with the rest largely following Interstate 85 in between.

Based on its study and the public comment received, the Committee shall recommend to the 2015 General Assembly a congressional redistricting plan so that the 2015 General Assembly may fully cooperate with the Federal Court Order by the end of this week, unless this Order is stayed by the United States Supreme Court.

I am very honored to have been chosen to participate on this very important and historic Committee because any adjustments to either the 1st or 12th Congressional Districts could cause a ripple effect to adjoining Congressional Districts and will affect how elections will be conducted in the future.


Wednesday, February 17, 2016 9:08 AM

February 15, 2016 Newsletter


I was previously appointed to the Joint Legislative Program Evaluation Oversight Committee (PED)by House Speaker Tim Moore.  The Committee Co-Chairs are Representative Craig Horn and Senator Fletcher Hartsell.  PED has been discussing, with input from the Department of Commerce, legislation to address changing the present Economic Development Tier System to assist communities with chronic economic distress. 

I was also previously appointed by the Speaker to the Joint Legislative Economic Development and Global Engagement Oversight Committee (EDGE).  The Committee Co-Chairs are Representative Susan Martin and Senator Harry Brown.  EDGE has also been discussing this issue with input from the Department of Commerce.

I made a suggestion that PED, EDGE and the Department of Commerce needed to get together so that we would not be going in different directions, we would all be on the “same page”, and the “left hand would know what the right hand was doing” about drafting the desired legislation.  I have been appointed by Representative Horn and Senator Hartsell to serve as the Chairman of the PED Joint Legislative Subcommittee on Economic Development.  The members of the Subcommittee are also members of EDGE.  The responsibility of the Subcommittee will be to look at the PED recommendations, the Department of Commerce approach, and develop a consensus as to the content of the proposed legislation.  The Subcommittee will meet on February 25 and make a report of its progress at the next PED meeting on March 14, 2016.

I will also request to the Co-Chairs of EDGE that I be allowed to address that Committee as to the progress of the PED Subcommittee at the next EDGE meeting on March 3, 2016.

I look forward to serving as the Chairman of this Subcommittee because it will be addressing such an important state-wide economic issue and reporting back to both PED and EDGE in an effort to support the goal of both Committees of enacting effective legislation that will properly assist our lower income Counties. 


Wednesday, February 3, 2016 9:01 PM

January, 2016 Newsletter

January was a busy start to 2016:

On January 4, I attended the ribbon cutting for the renovated New Hanover County Building located at 320 Chestnut Street.  I was a member of the Board of Commissioners when the decision was made to refurbish this building rather than to tear it down and build a new structure.  The Register of Deeds Office and the Public Defender’s Office, among others, will be located there. 

Also on January 4, I attended a Republican Caucus meeting in Raleigh.

On January 7, I attended an Economic and Global Engagement Oversight Committee meeting in Raleigh.

On January 8, I attended the North Carolina Republican Executive Committee meeting in Raleigh.

On January 11, I attended a Program Evaluation Oversight Committee meeting in Raleigh.

On January 14, I met with individuals in Wilmington to discuss Community Care of North Carolina and Medicaid reform in our State.

On January 19, I attended the Annual Strategic Workshop for the Pleasure Island Chamber of Commerce at Carolina Beach.  Carolina Beach Mayor Dan Wilcox, Kure Beach Mayor Emilie Swearingen and U.S. Congressman David Rouser were also present.  It was a wonderful opportunity for elected officials to talk with the Chamber members about various issues that are important to the Pleasure Island area.

On January 23, I served again as a Judge at the 2nd Annual Carolina Beach Inlet Association Chowder Cook Off in Carolina Beach.  I had a fantastic time sampling and voting on all of the entrees.  Proceeds from this event go to help raise awareness of the importance of preserving the Carolina Beach Inlet, which is a vital part of the local economy for Pleasure Island.

On January 25, I attended a legislative meeting with Hyde County and the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission in Swan Quarter to discuss the Mattamuskeet Lodge and economic development initiatives.  It was a very informative meeting and an excellent opportunity to discuss various issues with the members of the Commission and my fellow Legislators.

On January 27, I met with representatives from the North Carolina Department of Transportation concerning plans for ingress and egress pertaining to a new development at Echo Farms Subdivision.

On January 28, I visited Carolina Beach Elementary School.  I had the opportunity to read to a kindergarten class and visit 1st, 3rd and 5th grade classes.  I then met with the Principal and Staff members to discuss various educational issues.  It was a wonderful opportunity to observe our educators at work and see how our children benefit from such qualified and dedicated individuals.

Also on January 28, I attended a meeting of the Legislative Research Commission in Raleigh.  The business included approval of the Rules of Procedure of the Commission and approval of the Authorized Studies of the Commission.

On January 29, I attended the Star News Media Wilmington Theater Awards at Thalian Hall.  New Hanover County is very blessed to have so many local talented performers.  The arts are an important component of our community and make a major contribution to our wonderful quality of life.


Tuesday, February 2, 2016 9:02 AM

February 1, 2016 Newsletter

I was previously appointed to the Legislative Research Commissionby House Speaker Tim Moore.  The Commission Co-Chairs are Representative David Lewis and Senator Tom Apodaca. The Commission had its initial organizational meeting in Raleigh on January 28, and the business conducted included approval of the Rules of Procedure for the Commission; approval of Authorized Studies by Committees of the Commission; and the announcement of Committee Chairs and Members.  I was appointed by Representative Lewis to serve on the Committee on Municipal Service Districts as the House Co-Chairman with Senator Trudy Wade.

The Committee shall study the feasibility of authorizing property owners within a municipal service district to petition for removal from that municipal service district.

The Committee shall submit its report to the Commission on or before April 15, 2016.  The Commission shall report its findings and recommendations, including any proposed legislation, to the 2016 Session of the General Assembly.

I look forward to serving as a Chairman of this Committee and submitting the Committee Report to the Commission.


Thursday, January 21, 2016 2:27 PM

Rep. Ted Davis, Jr. appointed to the interim House Select Committee on Wildlife Resources

I am pleased to announce that I have been appointed by House Speaker Tim Moore to the interim House Select Committee on Wildlife Resources.

This Committee consists of 13 House members and may study any of the following:

1.      Updating or establishing registration of user fees.
2.      The current definitions and classification for all fish and wildlife species, including unclassified or undefined species to determine if such species should be defined, classified, or reclassified under State law.
3.      The potential use of State owned game lands for economic development.
4.      The verification process for lifetime hunting licenses.
5.      Potential funding sources for wildlife conservation education.
6.      Any other issues pertaining to the regulation or conservation of wildlife resources or the management of game lands in the State.

This Committee may submit either an interim report, or a final report, on the results of its findings, including any proposed legislation, to the members of the House prior to the convening of the 2016 Short Session of the General Assembly.

Since I am a member of the House Wildlife Resources Committee, I am very pleased to be chosen as a part of this interim committee because we may very well study important issues that may be contained in legislation that is subsequently considered by the House Wildlife Resources Committee during the 2016 Short Session.


Thursday, January 21, 2016 2:24 PM

January Newsletter

1/20/2016


I am pleased to announce that I have been appointed by House Speaker Tim Moore to the interim House Select Committee on Wildlife Resources.

This Committee consists of 13 House members and may study any of the following:

1.      Updating or establishing registration of user fees.
2.      The current definitions and classification for all fish and wildlife species, including unclassified or undefined species to determine if such species should be defined, classified, or reclassified under State law.
3.      The potential use of State owned game lands for economic development.
4.      The verification process for lifetime hunting licenses.
5.      Potential funding sources for wildlife conservation education.
6.      Any other issues pertaining to the regulation or conservation of wildlife resources or the management of game lands in the State.

This Committee may submit either an interim report, or a final report, on the results of its findings, including any proposed legislation, to the members of the House prior to the convening of the 2016 Short Session of the General Assembly.

Since I am a member of the House Wildlife Resources Committee, I am very pleased to be chosen as a part of this interim committee because we may very well study important issues that may be contained in legislation that is subsequently considered by the House Wildlife Resources Committee during the 2016 Short Session.


Friday, January 1, 2016 11:34 AM

December 30th Newsletter

December 30, 2015

While I realize that this newsletter is lengthy,  I want to share with you what I have been doing since the 2015 Session ended on September 30, 2015:

On Friday, October 2, I attended the Lower Cape Fear Republican Women’s Club Gala in Wilmington.

On Monday, October 5, I spoke to the Wilmington East Rotary Club about the 2015 Session and answered various questions from the members. 

On Wednesday, October 7, I attended a Program Evaluation Division (PED) Committee meeting in Raleigh.

On Tuesday, October 20, I attended a presentation by the New Hanover County ABC Board at their new location on Judges Road in Wilmington.  It was an interesting discussion and I learned a lot of information concerning the economic impact that our local ABC Board has on New Hanover County.

On Wednesday, October 21, I attended both a PED Subcommittee on Real Property and a PED Committee meeting in Raleigh.

On Tuesday, October 27, I attended a legislative meeting with the ILM Airport in Wilmington.  Representatives of the Airport discussed the status of the Airport operations and legislation that is important to that facility. 

On Wednesday, October 28, I attended the groundbreaking ceremony for the new Technology building at the north campus of Cape Fear Community College.  This was especially significant for me because I worked on this project when I was a member of the Board of Trustees.

On Friday, November 6, I attended the Wilmington Chamber of Commerce Oyster Roast and had the opportunity to discuss the 2015 Legislative Session with various individuals that were present.

On Tuesday, November 10, I attended a presentation in Wilmington by the United Way entitled “Advocate NC” which addressed legislation that occurred during the 2015 Session which effected non-profit organizations in North Carolina.  It was informative to learn how what we do in the General Assembly effects the various non-profit organizations in North Carolina..

On Thursday, November 12, I attended a meeting of the Americans for Prosperity for an informative discussion of Government’s involvement with our various sources of energy.

On Monday, November 16, I attended a meeting in Wilmington to discuss with local County and State representatives the future funding of beach re-nourishment.  As the federal government continues to decrease the funding for such an important local issue, New Hanover County and the beach communities therein must look for new ways to finance the re-nourishment that is so vital to our tourism industry.

On Wednesday, November 18, I had an interview with Tim Boyum, host of Capital Tonight, concerning the quality of life in New Hanover County and the resurgence of the film industry since the increased funding for the State film grant.  It was an excellent opportunity for me to brag about our wonderful community and emphasize the importance of the film industry to our region.

Also on that Wednesday, I addressed the statewide Board of Directors of the North Carolina League of Municipalities in Wrightsville Beach.  I spoke about relevant issues that were addressed in the 2015 Legislative Session and answered various questions from the Board members.  Afterwards, I attended a reception where I had the opportunity to talk to different Board members about issues that were important to them. 

On Thursday, November 19, I attended a North Carolina Trucking Industry meeting in Wilmington.  I listened to various presentations and talked to different individuals about the trucking industry and legislation that is important to this business.

On Friday, November 20, the Consumer Energy Alliance hosted representatives of Shell Oil for a question-and-answer session in Wilmington concerning the impact that offshore oil and natural gas drilling could have on Southeastern North Carolina.  Since I am aware of concerns that individuals who live in Wrightsville Beach, Carolina Beach and Kure beach have about offshore drilling, it was very informative to learn about marine seismic technology and drilling because this information will help me to make an informed decision concerning this possible endeavor.

On Monday, November 23, 2015, I attended both a PED Subcommittee on Real Property and a PED Committee meeting in Raleigh.

Also on that Monday, I had a conversation with a lobbyist for National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) North Carolina, which is a grassroots organization for people affected by mental illness.  It was very informative for me to learn about this organization and its priorities for service for those that are mentally ill in our State.

In addition on that Monday, I was interviewed by Charter Communications concerning the history of the film industry in Wilmington and the resurgence of the film industry since the increased funding for the State film grant.  It was another excellent opportunity for me to brad about our wonderful community and emphasize the importance of the film industry to our region.

On Wednesday, December 2, 2015, I attended the Pleasure Island Chamber of Commerce Annual Membership Dinner Meeting.  I had the opportunity to learn more about what the Chamber does for Carolina Beach and Kure Beach, as well as meet and talk to some great people.

On Thursday, December 10, after spending time with my daughter in Charleston, South Carolina, I attended the swearing-in ceremony for the newly elected members of the Kure Beach Town Council.  I look forward to working together with the new Town Council on behalf of those who live on Pleasure Island. 

During the morning of Monday, December 14, I attended the initial meeting of the House Select Committee on Sleep Therapy and that afternoon I attended a PED Committee meeting.  Both of these meetings were in Raleigh.

On December 16, I met with members of the Recreational Fishing Alliance of North Carolina to discuss the North Carolina Marine Fisheries Commission and the management of the southern flounder fishery in our State.  There is a contentious relationship between the recreational fishermen and the commercial fishermen concerning the recent imposition of limits by the Commission on flounder fishing.  This topic might eventually be addressed by the Legislature.

Also on December 16, I attended a dinner social and meeting with representatives of Vertex Railcar Corp. to celebrate the initial 30 grain hopper cars that were produced at their new Wilmington plant.  The local plant has received orders for a total of 3,900 cars since September, and also plans to make oil tankers in the future.  This new venture will provide wonderful job opportunities and economic benefit to New Hanover County.

On December 18, I was invited to attend a meeting of the NC Travel and Tourism Coalition at Wrightsville Beach to receive an inaugural “Tourism Champion” Legislative Award, as a result of my work during the 2015 Session concerning the room occupancy tax; film grant; and other tourist-related legislation.

On December 28, I met with representatives of the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority to discuss potential legislation matters to be addressed during the 2016 Short Session.

Separate and apart from legislative business, Jane and I spent the Christmas Holidays in Wilmington with our daughter and her husband who live in Charleston, South Carolina, as well as our son, his wife and our almost 3 year old grandson (Tee) who live here.  Below is a picture of Tee telling Santa Claus what “Da” (me) wants for Christmas!  It was wonderful being able to spend time with our family during this very special time of the year. 




I wish each and every one of you a blessed 2016!


Monday, December 21, 2015 6:29 PM

Rep. Ted Davis, Jr. to run unopposed for re-election to the North Carolina General Assembly, House District 19

"I am very humbled that I will not have any Republican or Democratic opposition to my re-election to the North Carolina House of Representatives. I look forward to continuing to represent those who live in House District 19, as well as the remainder of New Hanover County."

~ Rep. Ted Davis, Jr.


Monday, December 21, 2015 5:46 PM

Newsletter—December 21, 2015

“Jobs Champions” Designation by the North Carolina Chamber

The North Carolina Chamber has published a ranking of where Legislators stood on North Carolina’s Jobs Agenda.  The Chamber reported that I voted in favor of 26 out of 28 job-related legislation, or 93%, that the Chamber considered during the 2015 Session.  As a result, I was included in the designation of “Job Champions”.

Pro-Business Ratings by the North Carolina FreeEnterprise Foundation

The North Carolina Free-Enterprise Foundation (NCFEF) has released its 2015 Legislative Business Rankings.  This analytical assessment of the business disposition of all of the House and Senate members was based on confidential input from a group of more than 400 business leaders, business trade association executives and governmental affairs professionals.  The survey contained two parts, an Objective Evaluation and a Subjective Evaluation.  The Objective Evaluation consisted of legislation voted on during the 2015 Session where the respondent believed the subject “presented a clear philosophical division on key issues of interest and concern to the business community.”  The Subjective Rating consisted of a candid assessment by the respondent based on their “personal experience as to the percentage of time that the legislator was supportive on issues important to the overall business climate of North Carolina.”  Those surveyed were also asked to consider factors such as “legislators making themselves accessible for information sharing and discussion, and maintaining a business-like approach to the conduct of legislative duties.”  I received an Objective rating of 90% and a Subjective rating of 100%.

2015 Tourism Champion Award by the NC Travel & Tourism Coalition

This year, the NC Travel & Tourism Coalition chose 4 Legislators to receive their inaugural “Tourism Champion” award in recognition of outstanding support for the tourism industry, which employs more than 200,000 people and generates over $3.2 billion in State and Local taxes.  I am very honored to have been chosen as 1 of the 4 initial recipients of this award.  During the 2015 Session, I worked very hard to obtain the increased funding for the film grant; to insure that the integrity of the room occupancy tax was kept intact; and to support other legislation that benefited the travel and tourism business in North Carolina.  I was presented the award in Wrightsville Beach, NC by Kim Hufham, President/CEO of the Wilmington and Beaches Convention Visitor Bureau.





Monday, December 14, 2015 4:00 PM

December Newsletter

Speaker Tim Moore announced that I will serve on the new House Select Committee on Step Therapy.  The House Select Committee will study the cost-containment practice of step therapy, or fail-first protocols, whereby patients are forced to try and fail on a series of safe lower cost drugs or services before they are given access to the medication or service recommended by their physicians. “As an advocate for an efficient and effective healthcare delivery system, I am proud to announce the creation of a committee that will focus on ensuring quality access to healthcare,” said Speaker Moore.

The House Select Committee will study the impact that step therapy has on patient access to care.  They will consider the savings achieved by utilization of the practice, consider potential abusive practices, and perform a cost benefit analysis on patient protections that could be implemented to curb abuses.  In addition, the Committee shall assess the impact step therapy has on access to abuse-deterrent opioid analgesics.  The misuse and abuse of prescription opioids is a serious problem affecting families across our nation.  The estimated costs to our nation associated with healthcare, law enforcement and lost work productivity exceed $56 billion a year.

The Committee held its first meeting today in Raleigh.  The agenda included comments from the North Carolina Association of Health Plans, National Psoriasis Foundation, National Patient Advocate Foundation and Arthritis Foundation of NC, as well as testimonies from patients.

I am appreciative of having the opportunity to work on this very important issue because we must protect our citizens by making sure that treatment decisions stay in the hands of the physicians and their patients. 


Thursday, December 3, 2015 12:23 PM

Congressman David Rouzer and NC House Leadership show support for Rep. Ted Davis, Jr. at Nov. 9th fundraising event.

Our re-election campaign is proud to have the support of the North Carolina House Leadership and Congressman David Rouzer.

At our fundraiser in Wilmington on November 9, Congressman David Rouser, House Speaker Tim Moore and other House legislative leadership traveled from Charlotte, Kannapolis, Raleigh, Goldsboro and other areas of the State to show there support for my re-election.

Thank you to Speaker of the House Rep. Tim Moore, Congressman David Rouzer, House Majority Whip Rep. John Bell, Speaker Pro Tem Rep. Skip Stam, Rep. Linda Johnson, Rep. Jimmy Dixon, Rep. Bill Brawley, Rep. Nelson Dollar and Grandson "Tee" for the show of support at our November 9th event.

Special Thank You to Paula & Albert Corbett for hosting us.


Wednesday, December 2, 2015 12:00 AM

Several incumbents sign up on first day of candidate filing period

WILMINGTON, NC (WECT) -


Several incumbents signed up to run for re-election on the first day of the candidate filing period in North Carolina. 


State lawmakers Rep. Frank Iler (R-Brunswick), Rep. Ted Davis (R-New Hanover) and Sen. Bill Rabon (R-Brunswick) were among the first to visit their local Board of Elections office Tuesday afternoon. Davis has served two full terms after he replaced the retiring Danny McComas in the state House in 2012.

 


Monday, November 23, 2015 3:19 PM

November Newsletter

Commission Appointment

 
I have been appointed by the Speaker to the Legislative Research Commission.  The function of this Commission is to make or cause to be made such studies of and investigations into governmental agencies and institutions and matters of public policy as will aid the General Assembly in performing its duties in the most efficient and effective manner.  The Commission reports to the General Assembly the results of the studies and the reports may be accompanied by the recommendations of the Commission and bills suggested to effectuate the recommendations.  I am truly honored to be included as a member of this prestigious Commission.



Legisl
ative Award

 
I am a recipient of the Co-Defender of Occupancy Tax Integrity award from the North Carolina Travel Industry Association for my work as Chairman of the Finance Committee Occupancy Tax Subcommittee during the 2015 Legislative Session to protect the travel industry and to defend against the improper use of local occupancy taxes across North Carolina.  The award was presented in Charlotte and I am very appreciative of this recognition.

 

Legislative Recognition

 
I was presented with a recognition and sincere appreciation plaque from the Wilmington City Council for dedicated service and representation to the citizens of Wilmington during the 2015 Legislative Session.  I enjoyed working on various pieces of legislation that benefited the City of Wilmington and I am very appreciative of this recognition.

 

Dreams Contribution

 
Dreams is a wonderful organization located in Wilmington that allows underprivileged children to experience and be involved with dance, music and the arts.  When John Lyons with AT&T gave me the opportunity to direct a $1,000 contribution to any non-profit that I felt worthy, I immediately thought of Dreams because of the joy that it has brought to children not only in my District 19 but all of New Hanover County.  I thank John for allowing me to be a part of this well-deserved presentation to the members of the Dreams Board.

 

2015-16 Interim Committee

 
I have been appointed by the Speaker to serve as a Chairman of the Joint Legislative Oversight Committee on Local Government.  It will be the responsibility of this Interim Committee to review and monitor local government capital projects that are required to go before the Local Government Commission and require debt to be issued over one million dollars, with the exception of schools, jails, courthouses, and administrative buildings.  This Committee may make interim reports to the General Assembly on matters for which it may report to a regular session of the General Assembly.  I appreciate the confidence that the speaker has shown in allowing me this opportunity to provide leadership and oversight concerning efficient government spending. 


Saturday, November 21, 2015 3:33 PM

North Carolina Land Trust Legislator of the Year: Representative Ted Davis, Jr.

Representative Ted Davis, Jr. (R-New Hanover) has been a staunch advocate protecting threatened Venus Flytraps. Lands protected by NC State Parks, NC Wildlife Resources Commission, the US Forest Service, the NC Coastal Land Trust and The Nature Conservancy have all lost flytraps in recent years because of poaching.

Following the poaching of more than 1,000 Venus Flytraps from a carnivorous plant garden in Wilmington in 2013, Representative Davis took action.  He worked with conservationists and experts in plant conservation to craft a bill that made poaching flytraps in New Hanover County a felony, punishable by up to 25 months in prison.  He introduced the bill in the General Assembly in 2014. Four nearby counties asked that the provision apply to them as well, and eventually the legislation passed in amended form so that it applies statewide.

Under prior law, Davis said, criminals only got a “slap on the wrist” for stealing Venus Flytraps. Davis said it is important to try to preserve the plant in its natural habitat, “There’s only a small area for the Venus Flytrap to grow naturally. If it goes extinct there, it’s gone,” said Rep. Davis.


Wednesday, November 18, 2015 12:00 AM

Rep. Ted Davis, Jr. on Capital Tonight

On Capital Tonight: with Hal Kitchin giving an overview of the growth in the Port City.


Sunday, November 15, 2015 3:41 PM

N.C. Rep. Ted Davis to seek re-election

By Tim Buckland
StarNews Staff

NEW HANOVER COUNTY -- State Rep. Ted Davis, R-New Hanover, said Thursday he will run for re-election.
"I have thoroughly enjoyed representing people in my district," Davis said.

Davis was appointed to the House in September 2012 to fill the seat of former representative Danny McComas. Davis was re-elected in 2012, defeating Democrat Emilie Swearingen, and ran unopposed in 2014.


The filing period is Dec. 1 through Dec. 21.

Davis is chairman of the House Local Government Committee, vice chairman of the Rules Committee and holds numerous other committee posts, including on the Finance, Elections and Commerce committees.


Tuesday, September 1, 2015 10:43 AM

Newsletter -- Rep. Ted Davis, Jr. – September 1, 2015

Budget Conference Committee Appointment    

Speaker Tim Moore appointed me to the Budget Conference Committee.  As a House conferee, I will meet with Senate conferees to negotiate and advocate for provisions included in the House budget that passed with overwhelming bipartisan support. When making the appointment, Speaker Moore stated “I have great confidence in Ted, and am glad he will lend his expertise during this essential process.”

For instance, I am a House conferee for HB117 which includes the Senate’s provision to change the present distribution of sale’s tax.  If the present distribution was to change, it would be very financially detrimental to the governments of New Hanover County, Wilmington, Wrightsville Beach, Carolina Beach, and Kure Beach.  I am committed to opposing such a change and I will do everything that I can to protect everyone in New Hanover County and prevent this from happening.


Program Evaluation Oversight Committee Appointment

I serve as a House member on the Joint Legislative Program Evaluation Oversight Committee and I’ve been appointed by Representative Craig Horn, Chairman, to a subcommittee to review a report titled North Carolina Should Dispose of Unneeded Real Property and Improve Portfolio Management to Reduce Costs. The review will include receiving input from legislators, the Department of Administration, agencies and universities. The subcommittee then will propose draft legislation concerning the disposition of excess property for consideration by the Joint Committee.


Tuesday, August 18, 2015 10:38 AM

August Newsletter -- Rep. Ted Davis, Jr.

I have been appointed by Speaker Tim Moore to serve on the Fiscal Affairs & Government Operations Committee of the Southern Legislative Conference (SLC) of The Council of State Governments (CSG).  


Founded in 1947 and located in Atlanta, the Southern Legislative Conference is a member-driven organization and the largest of the four legislative groups operating under The Council of State Governments.  The SLC comprises the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.


Since its creation, members of the Fiscal Affairs & Government Operations (FAGO) Committee have focused on the myriad fiscal issues impacting state budgets and finances.  In the current era of depleted budgets and dwindling revenues, members of the FAGO Committee have explored the experiences of their Southern state counterparts in devising strategies in their own states.

 The Committee’s membership includes many of the finance and appropriations chairs from across the South along with other prominent fiscal players, both legislators and legislative staff, in the difference state legislatures.  The Committee routinely examines the impact of the federal budget on states finances; revenue forecasting in the 15-member states; healthcare reform; state fiscal trends; performance-based budgeting; e-commerce and taxation; and public pension plans.  In an effort to bolster ties between the South and the Federal Reserve Bank, the Committee has featured presentations on national and regional economic trends from the presidents of the Federal Reserve Banks of Atlanta, Dallas and St. Louis.


I am honored to have been selected to represent North Carolina on this important Committee and I look forward to working on behalf of our great State.


Wednesday, July 15, 2015 10:30 AM

July Newsletter -- Rep. Ted Davis, Jr.

I was busy during the 2013-14 Legislative Session working on various bills, some of which received favorable recognition, and included the following:  
I was the recipient of the North Carolina Land Trust “Legislator of the Year” for my work on the Venus Fly Trap Legislation.  I received a wonderful picture of the City of Wilmington as viewed from the Cape Fear River.

I received a “Legislative Award” from the North Carolina Metropolitan Mayors Coalition in recognition of my work on behalf of the State Film Industry.

I received a” Certificate of Recognition” from the Partners Against Trafficking Humans in NC in recognition of my Primary Sponsorship of the legislation to increase penalties on human trafficking convictions.  
I received an Honorary Wilmington Police Department Officer badge, #19 in recognition of representing House District 19, “with gratitude” for legislation that I had sponsored on behalf of the City of Wilmington and the Wilmington Police Department.

These recognitions are very special to me because they represent my work on various issues on behalf of not only New Hanover County, but the entire State of North Carolina.

In addition, I am presently in the 2015 Long Session of the Legislature and I have been very involved in handling various bills as well as chairing three Legislative committees. I am very proud that a bill that I sponsored just passed both the Senate and the House and was sent to the Governor for his signature.  It increased the penalties for amusement device violations and established a study for future zip-line regulations.
In addition, I was just appointed by Speaker Tim Moore to the Budget Conference Committee.  When making the appointment, Speaker Moore said “it is the House’s goal to remain inclusive and transparent throughout budget negotiations.  There are two very different plans on the table right now, and attention to detail is crucial.  I have great confidence in Ted, and am glad he will lend his expertise during this essential process.”


I am honored to have the opportunity to contribute and advocate for key issues that are important to the people of New Hanover County.  Ensuring that our region continues to provide strong economic and academic opportunities for North Carolinians will always remain my top priority.

 

 


Thursday, July 31, 2014 12:00 AM

Rep. Ted Davis Amendment in House Successful

This afternoon, NC House Rep. Ted Davis’ amendment to extend a slightly modified version the state’s existing film incentive program was adopted by the N.C. House.

Bill Vassar, Executive Vice President of EUE/Screen Gems Studios in Wilmington, NC responded: “We are absolutely thrilled at the passion of Rep. Ted Davis and the miracle that occurred this afternoon. We want to salute and thank Ted Davis for his unwavering efforts and support."


Paid for By Davis for NC House
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